Thursday, August 30, 2007

To swamped to blog...




Please enjoy the HAMS while I pour myself into the final days of finishing the draft of Daddy's Little Girl.



Wednesday, August 29, 2007

Friendship

I’m writing a new book, my 19th, that is a compilation of inspirational stories about father-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom, teach moral and important life lessons, and give others insight into how to nurture and maintain a healthy, loving and fulfilling father-daughter relationship.

For more information about my writing background, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com.

Now on to today’s post…

This just in from my friend Ali:

“According to my dad, the greatest life lesson is friendship. Not truth or honesty or the golden rule or anything else that the majority of people think is the most sacred, but friendship. That’s not to say those others aren’t extremely important as well, but a great friendship is actually built on those lessons.

As far back as I can remember my Dad has reiterated to me the importance of friendship. The first time I can actually remember him seriously talking to me about it I was about 8 years old. He described to me how it’s important to have friends, because those relationships are gifts, and a good friend will always be there for you. Young as I was, he described it to me in such a way that I knew that it was a big deal.

He told me that friends are one of life’s greatest gifts, and that they should always be treated as you yourself would like to be treated. He said that there are people in life that you have to be willing to go out of your way for, and that those people will be there for you should you need them, just as you must be there for them. At the end of that first conversation, I remember him talking about Monica, my best friend. “Monica is one of the good ones babe, friends like that don’t come along very often,” and I knew, then and there, that he was right.

My dad has a hard time putting into words what it means for him to have the friendships that he does. In fact, when we were talking about this whole thing, he was choked up and unable to look me in the eye or find the right words to explain it. But the lesson of friendship has been proven to me time and again, through events that have taken place in both of our lives.

When his mother was losing her battle with cancer, his best friend showed up at the hospital without being asked, and was actually in the room with my parents when my grandma took her last breath. Many others would have shied away from a situation like that, but my dad’s friend knew that he needed him, so was there no questions asked.

More recently in my life, it has come to light that I may not be able to carry a child. After some thought, my best friend has offered to carry a baby for me, should it be decided upon that my body just can’t do it. For me, there is no greater gift; it’s like her offering part of her life for me.

But the reverse is also true, if she were to call me tomorrow, and for whatever reason needed me, I would be on a plane in a heartbeat, because when she needs me, I go, just as my dad would for any one of his friends.

The older I get, the more I understand why my dad feels so strongly about his friendships, and chose to instill that same importance in me. Your family should always be there, but your friendships have chosen you. For whatever reason, you were brought together with someone, it’s inexplicable, but it should be treasured. As much as I wish that my dad could be with me throughout my entire life, I know that when he is gone, my best friend will be here beside me, like he always said she would be.”

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Tuesday, August 28, 2007

Be Bop A Lula

I’m writing a new book, my 19th, that is a compilation of inspirational stories about father-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom, teach moral and important life lessons, and give others insight into how to nurture and maintain a healthy, loving and fulfilling father-daughter relationship.

For more information about my writing background, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com.

Now on to today’s post…

Today’s photo is of Jeanine, Amber and Lily, pretty daddy’s girls if there ever where any.

I was chatting with a bookstore manager one day who also has a teenage daughter. We were sharing stories about how our own lives have changed as our little girls became young women. Each of us in our own way grieved a sort of loss; we missed the days when our daughters thought we had hung the moon.

Every dad has at least one memory of an event or gesture that, at least in his mind, is evidence of his desire to be a good dad. For this fellow in the bookstore, that memory was of something he used to do whenever he and his daughter found themselves on a plane. When she was a toddler, the takeoff phase of the trip was terrifying to her. In order to calm her down, he softly sang “Be Bop A Lula” to her. It worked every time.

Today his daughter’s musical interest is rap music and she is no longer charmed when he sings “Be Bop A Lula”. I think, though, he might occasionally hum that song to himself.

Now and then you might see someone do something that may seem out of place or make no sense at all, but the grin on their face tells you that although you can’t see it, the gesture has profound meaning. Like when you hear a middle-aged man humming “Be Bop A Lula” to himself while sorting magazines on the shelves of a crowded bookstore.

There are many ways in which a dad can be a hero to his daughter. Some involve strength of muscle, others, strength of character. Some dads are heroes because of a single act of selflessness he may have committed, others, because he has always been there doing for her what his daughter needed, without waiting to be asked to lend help. It doesn’t matter, really, how a daughter determines when her dad is a hero. He is, after all, her hero.

One morning while on a weekend getaway at an inn, Jill and I were having breakfast with another couple. As we chatted it eventually came out that I was working on this book. I asked the father if he had a close relationship with his daughter, and he politely replied that he did, but he didn’t elaborate.

His wife, eager to give him more credit than he gave himself, told me of a phone call about his daughter they received late one evening. The young woman was in trouble and needed immediate help. Dad jumped into the car and drove fourteen hours to reach his daughter, to rescue her.

The dad gave his wife that look that implied he didn’t want the attention, so she concluded her story abruptly, ending it with, “They are very close; he’s her hero.”

Our daughters’ hero; is their anything a dad would rather be?

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Monday, August 27, 2007

Today is going to be a good day!

I’m writing a new book, my 19th, that is a compilation of inspirational stories about father-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom, teach moral and important life lessons, and give others insight into how to nurture and maintain a healthy, loving and fulfilling father-daughter relationship.

For more information about my writing background, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com.

Now on to today’s post…

Today’s photo is of Ron and Lily, my neighbors, in the park in the middle of our cul-de-sac. I’m laughing behind the camera because Lily had just explained to me that round waffles taste better than square ones.

More memories of a daughter…

“Then came the time to learn to drive. He took me out on a day where it had just snowed and was a bit icy. The skies were beautiful but the roads weren’t so great; however, off we went because he felt that I needed winter driving experience! So we’re driving and driving and he starts quizzing me on various things I’d need to know for the driving test. He eventually asks me this, ‘What is a red octagonal sign?’ I said, ‘A stop sign!’ He then asked me how you were supposed to act when you saw the sign. Of course, I gave the appropriate, by-the-book answer and was pretty pleased with myself! He said, ‘Good! So tell me then, why did you run that stop sign back there?’

There were a few other hardy-har moments throughout my life, too. One had to do with my menstrual cycle! When I was 12 and I started my menstrual cycle, I was just plain ‘ol scared. Of course I’d had “the talk” with mom, but the reality of it was a little more real and quite daunting. So, I was in the bathroom just bawling my eyes out with my mom by my side and there was a knock on the door. It was dad. Mom stepped out to talk to him and when she came back in, she was chuckling up a storm. Well, dad was heading to town to have coffee with the guys and he was so concerned about this change in my life that he wanted to do something to help! So, he wanted to see if it would be okay to buy a congratulations card for me for having my first period. Oh, dad. Mom & I both laughed at that, but she graciously told him that, no, he couldn’t do that. It was the effort that counts, though.”

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Friday, August 24, 2007

Charlie Brown Xmas Tree

I’m writing a new book, my 19th, that is a compilation of inspirational stories about father-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom, teach moral and important life lessons, and give others insight into how to nurture and maintain a healthy, loving and fulfilling father-daughter relationship.

For more information about my writing background, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com.

Now on to today’s post…

Today’s photo is of Michael, Cody, Elizabeth and Caroline, husband and children of my cousin, Amy. It is Christmas day in the mountains outside of Seattle, and Mike has made sure his girls get their tree. To learn more, buy the book!

Here’s a few more stories recently sent to me:

“When I was twenty, my Daddy's Father passed away. The family gathered at Grandmother's after the funeral for a bite to eat and talk about the funeral and Granddaddy's life. During this time my Mother got a call from her sister relating that her Mother needed an emergency angioplasty in another town across the mountains. It was dark by then. Mother, my sister, her husband and I prepared to cross the mountains that night. The last thing my Daddy said to my sister's husband was ‘Y'all be careful. The most precious people in my life will be in that car going across those winding mountain roads tonight.’

Daddy is a fairly quiet man when it comes to expressing feelings. I could tell he was torn between being with his Mother at such a time and watching his most cherished going across the treacherous mountain roads without him. I could hear the love and concern for us all in his voice and see the difficulty of maintaining his composure. At that moment, I knew for certain that Daddy truly loved all of us deeply.”

and…

“Teenage years have a way of really defining a person. I wanted to do whatever I wanted, whenever I wanted. That's the only time I remember Daddy and I face-to-face, arguing. I was fourteen and refused to attend church. Tears were streaming down my face as I told him how unfair he was. I went to church that day, and thought, when I leave home, I'm never going back to church! Today, I am a Christian, a faithful attendant, and active in my home congregation. Thanks, Daddy!”

and…

“One the eve of my wedding (and my sisters’ weddings) my dad had a song sung for us that he wrote especially for us. Each song expressed his feelings about us as children and as we grew into young women. This was a defining moment in my relationship with my dad. Our relationship now still has the constant love, but it is constantly shown and expressed. It is the best feeling in the world!”

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Thursday, August 23, 2007

Love Stories






I’m writing a new book, my 19th, that is a compilation of inspirational stories about father-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom, teach moral and important life lessons, and give others insight into how to nurture and maintain a healthy, loving and fulfilling father-daughter relationship.

For more information about my writing background, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com.

Now on to today’s post…

Hurrah! My most recent book, “Why I Still Love You,” is in the Cumberland House warehouse. It should be in stores by mid-September. The photos above are from this book, a celebration of lasting love.

I was asked to write a paragraph explaining why I decided to write Daddy’s Little Girl. This is it:

“My reasons for writing Daddy’s Little Girl are twofold. Firstly, my daughter Meagan is now a high school senior preparing to enter college. Nearly every day we are reminded that in just over a year she will not only leave home, but our community as well. For her, this book is a reflection on the times we’ve spent together since I wrote Why a Daughter Needs a Dad, and a reminder that though she may leave the nest, she can never leave my heart. Secondly, my step-daughter, Linley, has now lived nearly three years with me and is embracing a new kind of daddy-daughter relationship, one that can be had with a step-dad. For her, this book is a promise that she can have as much of me as she wants; in these stories I hope she sees just how much that can be.”

A few stories sent to me by loving daughters:

“My dad is a funny guy with a great sense of humor. There were times we'd go to like McDonald's and he'd ask for Whooper, or Wendy's and ask for a Big Mac. He was doing it completely on purpose and yet looking serious. In my early teen years our family would go to a small lake that had a pier out over the deep end. It also had a floating deck with a slide, and just a fun place to cool off during the hot summer. One time I had a couple of friends there with us and we're sitting on the deck just talking. My dad is just be-bopping along the pier, when he acts like he trips and falls off the edge into the water with a big splash. My friends are laughing thinking my dad is a big klutz, but that was my silly dad acting up again.”

and…

“My most vivid memory of my father is when he would take me shopping. We would go into town and visit all his favorite stores. I also felt so important because he frequently asked my opinions regarding his purchases. Since my father never met a stranger, each of the store clerks and owners loved to see him come through their doors. During these trips, I looked up to him as if he was the mayor of the city! And, at the end of our shopping trips, I usually managed to bring something special home for myself!

My father and I continue to share a special bond. We seem to know what each other are thinking and are emotionally connected. He has always been there for me and has never let me down. I love him very much. For as long as I live, I will always be my Daddy’s little girl.”

and…

“Dad taught me that parenting is about affection, not perfection. For me, this awareness brings resiliency: the strength to dream — and pursue my dreams — knowing I can trust the safety of my father's love. If I ever have children of my own, I hope I can give them as much love and strength as my dad has given me.”

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!




Wednesday, August 22, 2007

Insights

I’m writing a new book, my 19th, that is a compilation of inspirational stories about father-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom, teach moral and important life lessons, and give others insight into how to nurture and maintain a healthy, loving and fulfilling father-daughter relationship.

For more information about my writing background, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com.

Now on to today’s post…

This from a daughter:

“My dad was always there, he was my hero, my mother, father, friend, nanny, brother just everything and he still is. He always told me how beautiful I was and intelligent, I always felt perfect. My experiences are just too many but I’ll settle for this one.

I must say I was kind of a stubborn child and wanted to have and actually had things my way 99% of the time. Once I was going back to boarding school, my dad gave me what I considered a ridiculous amount of money, I just couldn’t take it, it was too small for me and my taste. So I was trying to object, he threw it at me, I felt my dad had done the worse thing ever, so I left the money on the ground of his room and went straight to my friend’s house whose driver dropped us in school, our school was 3 hours away. Next morning at 8am my dad was in my school very worried and of course with the exact amount of money I had demanded! Note I said demanded because now I know how unreasonable and selfish I was.

Looking back now I realise how selfless my dad was, he loved us all unconditionally, it wasn’t the money. It was the fact that he felt he had hurt me. He put everything on hold, woke up real early to be at my school. Living in a country where female children were not to be “invested in”, he still single handily raised me and my 7 sisters, we lacked nothing. He never got himself anything new; he just lived for us all and our happiness. Even when we started to get our first pay cheques, he insisted we use the money wisely, he didn’t want any of it, and we should get all the things he couldn’t get for us.

I love my dad very much, He’s a lawyer and so am I, am married now and all grown up but I secretly believe that no man can measure up to him. He was and still is my hero.”

And this from a dad:

“A daughter is like a fragile, delicate butterfly that momentarily lands on your outstretched hand, pauses -- flexing her wings -- and then continues on her erratic flight. As you watch, fascinated, she continues onward and upward -- reaching heights you cannot attain, going farther than you can travel. In her fragility is her strength, and in her transience is our heartbreak. If you watch her carefully and humbly, she will teach you much.

I have the great fortune of a son and a daughter, with a space of eight years between them. My son, Kevin, is the elder. He could be stubborn and willful. He would debate long and loudly his viewpoint. Disciplining him took both hands on the tiller, like an unruly ship in rough seas. Decibels ruled.

On the other hand, Erin taught me early on the futility of my manly bravado.

When Erin was a preteen, after a long-forgotten disagreement, I forcefully dictated she go to her room. She pivoted from me, and in slow motion hung her head, drifting down the hallway. I watched as she painstakingly stopped, turned, and looked at me. A single tear worked its way down her cheek and fell to the floor. Silently she disappeared into her room.

I stood alone in the living room and marveled at what had just transpired. From that point on I never chastised her so forcefully. I learned the power of gentleness.

She had taught me a valuable lesson that daughters are different than sons and must be treated as such. I realized that daughters are not only to be encouraged, protected and enjoyed; they are also to be cherished and loved.”

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Monday, August 20, 2007

Sometimes tomorrow comes early...

I’m writing a new book, my 19th, that is a compilation of inspirational stories about father-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom, teach moral and important life lessons, and give others insight into how to nurture and maintain a healthy, loving and fulfilling father-daughter relationship.

For more information about my writing background, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com.

Now on to today’s post…

Actually, I posted this last night because I had to hit the road early this AM for a road trip to Nashville. Yes, me alone in the car for eight hours. That means it’s going to be an Allman Brothers concert all the way, to and fro.

These little nuggets just in:

“When I was 10, my father fell and broke his leg in four places; he had a cast on from toe to upper thigh. He was bed ridden for approximately 10 weeks. This just happened to happen around the start of summer. It was awesome for me, because my dad was home most of the summer. I spent more time in my parents’ bed that summer than I don’t know where else. My dad and I watched TV together, we played scrabble, and we just talked. It was a 10 year olds dream come true to have dad at home all summer since he usually was at work during the day. I am sure I wished he were gone a few times and we didn’t get to take a family vacation we had been planning before that, but it was still one of the best summers I can remember.”

and…

“One of my special memories of my dad is when I got hurt playing baseball with my brothers. We were in our back yard, playing baseball with a basketball. My older brother throws the ball to me and I went to hit the ball and the bat fell back and hit me on the side of the head. I went inside and told my dad I was bleeding. I could see the color in his face turn white; he grabbed a towel and put me in the car. I remember the ride like it was yesterday, he was running ever red light, running over curbs, and going way over the speed limit. While he kept telling me I was going to be ok, patting my leg. I noticed we were not going to the hospital, but going to my mom work. He had to ask her if I needed to go to the doctor. She told him yes. He took me to the doctor, and while they sewed me up, he held my hand the whole time. I found out later, that my dad had a weak stomach and got sick very easy, especially at the sight of blood! I realized that day, no matter what I could count on my dad to be there for me.”

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Spoon Justice

I’m writing a new book, my 19th, that is a compilation of inspirational stories about father-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom, teach moral and important life lessons, and give others insight into how to nurture and maintain a healthy, loving and fulfilling father-daughter relationship.

For more information about my writing background, please visit my website, http://www.gregoryelang.com/.

Now on to today’s post, a revised version of an earlier story…

Ray told me of a television commercial he likes, one where a dad accepts a hug from his daughter who is about to go on a date with a boy standing at the door. As the dad holds his daughter he looks over her shoulder at the boy and without a word but in an unmistakable expression, tells the boy, “Be careful, I’m watching you.”

He shared with me that as he laughed at this commercial his twelve-year old daughter turned to him and asked, “That’s not going to be you, is it?”

Of course not, darling, what father worries about the boys that come to his door hoping to remove daddy’s little girl from his immediate reach?

As we talked I told him of one of my rules about dating. I require the young man to come inside for a chat, or the “interrogation” as Meagan calls it, so that I might gain a modicum of reassurance he is trustworthy of having time alone with my daughter. Everyone in my house knows to stand clear of the door should I not like or be convinced of an answer I should receive. As you might guess, I’ve already ruled out eight of ten boys having a future as my son-in-law by the time I’ve asked my third question.

Ray then told me of a large wooden spoon that hangs on the wall in his daughter’s bedroom.

Of Italian descent, he told me his grandmother, and later, his mother, used a large wooden spoon for stirring their carefully prepared sauces that simmered in a large pot on the kitchen stove. When his conduct merited it, the spoon also conveniently served a secondary purpose as a “correctional instrument.”


Some years after his daughter was born, he happened into an old kitchenware store and spied on a shelf, a dusty wooden spoon similar to the one that had effectively kept him in line as a young boy. He bought it, cleaned it up and hung it on the wall. When his daughter inquired why, he explained, “When you start dating, I’m going to have a chat with every boy that comes into this house. If I don’t like his answer to any of my questions, I’m going to whack him with that spoon.”

I’m sure his daughter was no more delighted with his answer than Meagan is knowing what I’m going to put each prospective Romeo through on their first date, but simply put, we don’t care; it’s a dad’s prerogative. Its one of the few things we look forward to and visualize in our minds, our new favorite smack-down sport, while we watch with suspicion the boys who pursue our girls-turning-into-young-women.

Yes, there is a reason why some of Meagan’s friends call me the Warden.

My neighbor Scott, his friend and I had lunch together one afternoon recently. Scott and I have daughters and his friend has two boys. Scott and I accused his friend of flirting with our waitress while she took our orders, speculating she might now spit in the “old men’s” tea before she served it to us. When he asked why we were bothered by his flirtations, Scott and I agreed that having daughters changed the way we looked at and thought about women.

He dared to ask, “Why?”

Scott summed it up beautifully. He said, “When you have a son you only worry about one penis. When you have a daughter, you worry about all the penises.”

One month ago Scott became the proud father of his second daddy’s girl. I’m thinking about buying him a large wooden spoon. Maybe two. I’m sure he’ll know what to do with them.

BTW, the photo is one I took of Scott, Reese and Rylee.

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Friday, August 17, 2007

Little Things, Big Memories

I am searching for inspirational stories about father-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom, teach moral and important life lessons, and give others insight into how to nurture and maintain a healthy, loving and fulfilling father-daughter relationship.

If you are a father or a daughter, I want to hear about your parent-child relationship experiences. For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

Now on to today’s post…

“At one time I cut my own hair. I didn’t think highly of paying a stylist; my own clippers where good enough for me, and when I was away from home and found myself needing a haircut, any old barber would do. Meagan and Linley didn’t understand this about me; they both once agreed I had the hair-do of a weather man nearing an overdue retirement.

They, on the other hand, are always looking forward to their next hair appointment. They both have a zillion bottles of bath and body products, nearly all of which are designed for use with their hair. Both would willingly make the Pope late for Mass as they blocked the vestibule while standing in a mirror adjusting and readjusting a single stand of hair until it finally fell into its destined place.

The time and effort those two natural beauties put into trying to be even more beautiful was something I didn’t understand about them.”

and…

“One evening during a neighborhood picnic a fellow down the street told me he had recently waved at Meagan at a traffic light. After asking me how comfortable or nervous I am knowing that she is driving in Atlanta’s congested traffic, he told me of how he is beginning to let his seventeen-year-old daughter drive her car alone, but only when he can follow closely behind her in his own car so that he can keep an eye on her.

I remembered my mom’s comment about Meagan not being a little girl anymore. I turned to his daughter who was standing nearby and while making a scissor cutting motion with my fingers, I said, ‘It sounds like we need to cut through some apron strings.’

‘I think you’re going to need hedge clippers,’ she said.”

and…

“Jennifer didn’t understand at first but listened as best she could while licking vanilla icing from her fingers. Her dad said that everybody has their own personal rules, and one person cannot possibly follow everybody else’s rules. He said that she couldn’t be her own person by following rules her whole life and that it would do her some good to break a few now and then. He wanted his daughter to break one rule every day; that as long as breaking that rule doesn’t hurt anybody, it was okay.

After their talk, Dad and Jennifer sat by a window and talked about the planes that went by. They agreed that Mom shouldn’t know about the cupcake, since she was the one that really sent her to bed without dinner.”

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Thursday, August 16, 2007

Daddy Stories

I am searching for inspirational stories about father-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom, teach moral and important life lessons, and give others insight into how to nurture and maintain a healthy, loving and fulfilling father-daughter relationship.

If you are a father or a daughter, I want to hear about your parent-child relationship experiences. For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

Now on to today’s post…

“Back when Sarabeth was a child living at home, her dad returned from work every Valentine's Day carrying three boxes of chocolates and three bundles of roses, one of each for the women in his life, his wife and two daughters. He never forgot a Valentine's Day; he continued to send Sarabeth chocolates and a card even after she had left home to attend college.

When asked why he gave gifts to his daughters in addition to his wife, her father didn’t hesitate and answered, ‘If you don't set the standard high, your daughters might settle for someone not worthy of her. You must set the standard high.’

Her father did set the standard high; Sarabeth’s husband of fourteen years makes sure she and their two daughters receive a box of chocolates on every Valentine's Day.

Another woman once told me of how her dad and his twin brother learned to play cribbage while serving in the Army during the Second World War. The brothers in turn taught their children how to play the Army way, which meant cussing at crucial moments during the game.

Doris and her father would settle down to play cribbage after dinner, knowing full well mom would not approve of the course language coming from her daughter’s mouth. Nevertheless, it was a bonding experience between she and her dad, one she enjoyed immensely.

Years after her dad died her mother asked if there was anything she wanted to take as a remembrance of her father. She chose his cribbage board.

Later she herself had children and when he was old enough, Doris taught her son to play cribbage. During one lesson she gave him a piece of advice she had learned at her daddy’s knee. As her son debating what to discard, she told him what her dad had told her: “Never give the other bastard anything.”

Her son now uses that phrase in his daily conversations, much to the delight of his mother.

One of Ann’s favorite memories of her dad had to do with his popularity among the other fathers in the neighborhood. Know to all as “Sonny,” he often set out his Coleman stove in the yard and began to cook a huge batch of French fries. Soon other dads would appear with cold beers in hand, talk about sports or work and munch on the crispy, hot fries. Any day Sonny broke out the stove was known as Father’s Day, and the dads all toasted him for hosting the event that provided a little break from the tasks that filled their lives.”

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Wednesday, August 15, 2007

Loving Sacrifice

I am searching for inspirational stories about father-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom, teach moral and important life lessons, and give others insight into how to nurture and maintain a healthy, loving and fulfilling father-daughter relationship.

If you are a father or a daughter, I want to hear about your parent-child relationship experiences. For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

Now on to today’s post…

“Amy Jo enjoys many memories of things her dad has done. When she was young he would lie on the floor and let her walk on his back, and some days he would bite in the air trying to get a mouthful of “witch’s claws,” the Bugles Amy Jo wore on her fingers and waved in front of his face. When she was a teen he spent hours trying to teach her how to pitch a softball. He cried at her wedding, and again, but more profusely, when his grandson was born.

But the memory of her dad’s actions that Amy Jo treasures most is something he did that he has attempted to hide. He doesn't talk about the fourteen inch bright red scar that starts just below his left nipple and crosses over his belly; a scar he has borne for nearly ten years.

Her father, Dan, was the second born in a line up of seven boys. All the brothers played hockey, but her dad was one the most talented and well known in town for his skill on the ice. During the winter hockey season he and his brothers packed down the snow in their back yard and practiced skating on their makeshift rink.

Amy Jo remembers being a child and getting bundled up against the Pittsburg cold so she could go outside and watch her Daddy play hockey. Even as an adult, the sport was still a large part of Dan’s life.

When she was a junior in high school, Amy Jo learned of her dad’s brother’s kidney disease, a condition he had dealt with for years but which had suddenly worsened. He was placed on a kidney transplant waiting list and began to take steroids to keep his systems from shutting down. Concerned for his brother’s life, Dan volunteered to be tested to see if he were a donor candidate. They were a near perfect match.

Amy Jo’s uncle told his brother to take some time to think over the possible consequences of being a donor, but Dan didn't need time; his mind was made up. A few hours later, the surgery was scheduled.

The surgery was a success and Amy Jo stayed home with her dad for a few days after he was released from the hospital. He recovered quickly and by summer, when his daughter was preparing to leave home to attend college, he was back in tip-top shape.

Living in the college dorm was Amy Jo’s first time being so far removed from her family; she called home almost every day just to hear about familiar routines. One day in late fall, when avid hockey players are usually on the ice nearly everyday, it occurred to her that no one had mentioned her dad's hockey games.

Her mother quietly told her then that her dad wasn't playing anymore. Since he now had only one kidney, he wasn't supposed to play contact sports for fear of sustaining a life-threatening injury himself. Amy Jo asked if he knew of that limitation before he agreed to the operation.

‘It was one of the first things the doctors told him,’ her mom said.

Her father had not only willingly given away a part of his body, he also forfeited an important part of his life for the benefit of someone else. Inspired by her dad’s example for loving others before your self, Amy Jo has become an organ donor, and now more than ever, understands the rewards of self-sacrifice.

Her uncle now lives a normal life, completely free of disease.”

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Tuesday, August 14, 2007

Muffins

I am searching for inspirational stories about father-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom, teach moral and important life lessons, and give others insight into how to nurture and maintain a healthy, loving and fulfilling father-daughter relationship.

If you are a father or a daughter, I want to hear about your parent-child relationship experiences. For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

Now on to today’s post…

“Each morning Linda eats the top half of a chocolate chip muffin, the only part of the pastry she really likes, and then saves the bottom half for her dad who will eat it later. What began on her part as an effort to eat light and on dad’s part as an attempt to rescue Linda from mom’s ire over wasting food, the muffin sharing scenario had become a ritual in their household. Not only is the ritual an easy way to share a quick breakfast, it is, at least for Linda, an important symbol of their daddy-daughter relationship.

In her way of thinking, the bottom half of the muffin represents her dad; she is the upper half. She rises and flourishes, stabilized and supported, standing on the shoulders of her dad, Mike.

Throughout her life, Mike has been devoted to supporting his daughter’s dreams. When she was five years old and told him of her plans to have eighty children when she grew up, he promised to be a helpful grandfather. Both competitive types, they played tennis together as often as they could, Mike helping Linda to become a star tennis player and eventually captain of her high school team. Later, in a continued effort to support and encourage his daughter, he became the coach of her softball all-star team and practiced with her as often as she wanted.

While they loved spending time together playing sports, academics always came first with Mike. He spent as much time editing papers, listening to speeches and reviewing and quizzing vocabulary words as he did on the tennis court or softball field. He was there to help Linda succeed, urging her along but never pushing her more than he should. She began to excel in school just as she had in other aspects of her life.

Equally concerned about Linda’s moral aptitude, Mike was also attentive to important life lessons, like making sure his daughter developed a habit of giving back to others. He was known around town as the cookie guy; beginning two weeks before Christmas he baked cookies and delivered them to the public servants in the area. Since the age of six, Linda has helped her dad find decorative cookie tins at yard sales and then to bake hundreds of chocolate chip and old fashioned sugar cookies. She carefully packed them in the tins along with a Thank You note they had written.

Just before Christmas, Mike and Linda spend an entire day driving through town to deliver the cookies to the fire, police, and emergency departments, as well as a few of their lucky neighbors. They have been doing this now for fifteen years.

Linda is about to graduate from college and begin her career; she is hardly a little girl anymore. But she is a capable and confident young woman, in large part because of the support she has always received from her dad. And yes, he still eats the bottom half of her chocolate chip muffins, even though blueberry is his favorite.”

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Monday, August 13, 2007

Mani, pedi

I am searching for inspirational stories about father-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom, teach moral and important life lessons, and give others insight into how to nurture and maintain a healthy, loving and fulfilling father-daughter relationship.

If you are a father or a daughter, I want to hear about your parent-child relationship experiences. For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

Now on to today’s post…

Daddies never stop thinking about their daughters, and daughters never stop thinking about their dads. Daughters young and mature share a common desire for the company and comfort of their fathers. They want their daddies to take care of them, in different ways, perhaps, but to offer their fatherly love and comfort nonetheless. Daddies live to give that love and comfort to their little girls.

From my front porch I’ve watched dads walking the streets of the neighborhood with an infant asleep in a pack on his back, or running while pushing a stroller, complete with a child yelling, “Faster, faster, Daddy!” I’ve watched dads and children play Wiffle Ball, dive onto a water slide, learning to ride a bicycle, and climb trees, all from the comfort of my wicker chair.

There are more young girls living in the homes on my cul-de-sac than there are boys; the dads I observe are more often enjoying those activities with their daughters than with sons. My daughters are among the oldest children who live nearby, and now and then a dad asks me for fresh ideas about what to do with his daughter when she grows up and tires of climbing trees.

“Take her to get a pedicure, and get one yourself while you’re at it,” I often say.

My recommendation is universally met with a little shock and a lot of disbelief.

“That’s women’s stuff,” is the most common response I hear.

“Precisely,” I say.


My point in suggesting a pedicure is simple. Little girls want to do everything little boys do, which plays right into dads’ hands. However, teen girls want to do what young women do, which nearly never makes sense to grown men.

I’ve had many a pedicure (buff only, please, no polish). I let the girls do my hair before we go out, help me select clothes and shoes, and give me a fashion make-over once in a while (once I inadvertently went to work wearing a pair of stick-on earrings, so be careful). I take them shopping, truly an excruciating experience for me because we cannot purchase the first thing we liked until we have visited at least fifty other stores to make sure we “really, really” liked it, but I tag along with them without complaint. It makes them happy, which in turn, delights me as well.

Attentive dads understand the importance of making children feel special in ways that are meaningful to them at their age at the time. I know a father who has triplets; two daughters and a son. One can understand why the parents of multiple birth children might elect to host only one birthday party, but that’s not how Michael does it. He allows each child to plan their own party, and then facilitates all three, one after the other on three different weekends. Whether he is hosting a baseball game, a pool party or a slumber party, each child, each daughter, gets to be his special person of the day. Believe me, they love it; I’ve seen their faces.

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Friday, August 10, 2007

Musing


I am searching for inspirational stories about father-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom, teach moral and important life lessons, and give others insight into how to nurture and maintain a healthy, loving and fulfilling father-daughter relationship.

If you are a father or a daughter, I want to hear about your parent-child relationship experiences. For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

Now on to today’s post…

This is an edited version of something I wrote earlier and have since improved upon as I have worked through several drafts of Daddy’s Little Girl:

“It seems that in spite of all the differences there may be between the fathers and daughters of the world, be he a doctor or craftsman, she a student or lawyer, early or late in life, religious or not, wealthy or not, dads and daughters are very much alike in the manner in which they relate to one another.

Dads put their daughters before their own interests, striving to create special moments and lasting memories for her, protecting her from harm and disappointment, always seeking to spend quality time together, always praying never to let her down. Daughters anticipate daddy coming home, eager to show him a new trick, a report card, or request his counsel on a matter of concern. As much as daughters enjoy being a daddy’s girl, dads enjoy having one to dote on.

Daughters enjoy their dads always being available to her and never tiring of her need for his attention and affection. Daughters crawl into their daddies’ lap to hug and kiss him before resting her head on his chest, sometimes asking him to sing their favorite song. Dads never forget those moments when he could hold his daughter in his arms, and is always ready to sing to her, even if over the telephone.

Dads find meaning, purpose and fulfillment in their important role in their daughters’ lives. They do not shy away from the unfamiliar girl stuff, the hard tasks of parenting, nor their daughters’ tears or demonstrations of independence and revolt. Dads stand ready to help whenever the need arises, even if in the darkest hours of the night. Daughters never forget those moments when her dad proved once more that he was indeed the hero who would never let her down.

Daughters look to dads for help with school projects, his applause during her performances or events, to be a friend when she is lonely, and to help her out of sticky situations. Daughters give their dads an affection he cannot find anywhere else, and a love he will cherish to the end of his last day.

Dads find ways, sometimes in the face of limited resources, to make things fun, special, possible, for their daughters. Dads show their daughters the world, and the importance of smaller, everyday things, like having dinner together, talking, and holding hands now and then.

It also seems that age has little to no bearing on a woman’s desire to have her place as a daddy’s little girl. As toddlers, little girls fear their dads have disappeared when he leaves the room; as an adult, daddies’ little girls fear the time that remains with their fathers will pass all too quickly. Daddy’s girls remain daddy’s girls even long after daddy has passed away.

Indeed, every daughter is a daddy’s little girl, and every daddy wouldn’t have it any other way.”

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Thursday, August 09, 2007

Part II

I am searching for inspirational stories about father-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom, teach moral and important life lessons, and give others insight into how to nurture and maintain a healthy, loving and fulfilling father-daughter relationship.

If you are a father or a daughter, I want to hear about your parent-child relationship experiences. For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

Now on to today’s diary entry…

Part 2 of Patty’s story:

“Our state had a requirement that all Freshmen, upon completion of basic English, were required to take an Exam, known as the English 101 Final. It was scheduled on a Saturday morning and all English students would take it at the same time in different classrooms. The Exam consisted of several timed essays on topics given us on the test as well as a grammar section. Daddy and I were both required to take the 101 Exam, but were in different classes. Our professors warned us that the test usually had a current affairs topic, so Daddy and I studied together and briefed each other on all the current events we could think of. We went into our finals well-prepared and confident.

My exam was being administered in a different building than Dad’s. The essays were the first part of the test, then we had a 15 minute break before jumping into the Grammar section. I took off for Daddy’s classroom, only to discover he wasn’t there.

“Perhaps he went to the snack bar for a cup of coffee,” I reasoned. When I walked into the snack bar, Daddy was sitting at a table with two cups of coffee, smiling. He knew I’d come, and he was ready with a cup of coffee for me, too. We talked excitedly about what topics we had chosen for our essays and how we thought we did before returning to our respective classrooms to finish the Exam.

A week later I went to see my professor to get my score. I got an ‘A’. As pleased as I was, I had to know how my father had done. About 50 percent of English 101 students failed this Exam, and I was dying to know if my father had missed the bullet. I asked my professor if he’d give me my father’s grade.

“You know that’s against the rules, Patti,” he said. “I could get in a lot of trouble if I violated your father’s privacy by giving you his score.”

“I know,” I responded, “but I don’t know when he’s going to have time to get his own grade from his professor, and I’ve just got to know if he passed.”

“Do you know his social security number?” he asked. I rattled it off and he told me that Daddy had passed.

I ran to the nearest payphone and dialed my father’s office number. As soon as he answered, without any preamble, I yelled into the phone, “Guess what?”

“You got an ‘A’!” Daddy answered. It didn’t sound like he was guessing.

“How did you know?” I asked, incredulous.

“I got my professor to give me your grade,” he answered.

“And I got mine to give me your grade!” We both laughed, pleased with our own scores, but even more pleased with each other’s.”

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Wednesday, August 08, 2007

Green Midget

I am searching for inspirational stories about father-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom, teach moral and important life lessons, and give others insight into how to nurture and maintain a healthy, loving and fulfilling father-daughter relationship.

If you are a father or a daughter, I want to hear about your parent-child relationship experiences. For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

Now on to today’s post…

Today's photo is of Reese, my neighbor and model next door.

Part 1 of Patty’s story:

“When my oldest sister began college at our local University, she and Daddy discussed his college career. Being raised in the backwoods of Canada, hunting and trapping, he had moved away from home at 16 and held down two jobs so he could attend high school in a larger town that had one. When he joined the Army, he began taking college courses, but never finished his degree. My older sister encouraged him to attend school with her, thinking this was something they could share. My father jumped at the chance.

They began taking courses together, studying together in the evenings, and comparing grades. I don’t know which of them enjoyed this more. Then my sister moved to California to marry and Daddy stopped attending college … until my turn.

When I decided to stay at home for my first year in college, I began attending our local university, as my sister had. Daddy decided it would be fun to study with me, also, so he went to visit the Registrar. He was told that he had enough credits for two Bachelor’s degrees, but none of his core curriculum and not enough credits in any one field to declare a Major. So he and I began taking our core together. He’d get me up in the morning and, while I was dressing, he’d warm up my car for me. On my way out the door, he’d put a cup of hot tea, just the way I liked it, in my hands to drink on the way to school. We would always take different routes to see who got there first. I drove a little green MG midget that fit perfectly in a half-parking space in the first row in the parking lot. One day, Daddy beat me to the campus, parked and walked over to my space. A woman in a large sedan was just pulling into the space next to my usual one, but she parked a little over the line. My father tapped on her window.

“Excuse me, Ma’am, but a little green car is going to be pulling in here any minute and needs to park next to you. Do you suppose you could back out and pull your car a little further to the left to make room?”

The astonished woman did as he asked and was just turning off her car when I pulled into my half-space, jumped out, and joined Daddy for our walk to class.”

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Tuesday, August 07, 2007

Hello...



I am searching for inspirational stories about father-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom, teach moral and important life lessons, and give others insight into how to nurture and maintain a healthy, loving and fulfilling father-daughter relationship.

If you are a father or a daughter, I want to hear about your parent-child relationship experiences. For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also collecting photos of dads and daughters to display on this blog. If you’d like to submit one, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

Now on to today’s diary entry…

Today’s photos are of our girls, taken this past weekend on our last summer of’ 07 beach adventure. Pretty, aren’t they?

The book: I’m getting down to the wire (5 weeks left ‘til deadline) and am shaping the book to arrive at what we think will be a great final product. Now it will be approximately 172 pages vs. 256, will have lots of open space (my readers so often paste in their own photos or personalize a story by writing directly on the page) and the stories will be somewhat shorter than originally planned. Less is more, as they say. In some cases what was once a 3 page story is being reduced to two paragraphs, but they are great, poignant paragraphs. I’m excited about it and hope you will love it when you see it.

Here’s a glimpse into what one daughter thinks of her dad:

“As a teen there was one time when I came home a little late because I kind of ruined the passenger door to the car. I really expected him to be a bit angry about that, but he was only concerned that I was ok. He did expect me to take responsibility and fix the door too. The teen years can also be a time when the girls can be embarrassed by dads in front of her friends. He enjoyed doing just that, embarrassing me. I remember a time when I was sitting on the front porch with some friends, and my dad comes from the back yard wearing some wild looking shorts, black socks (almost up to his knees), and shiny black shoes. Then as he walked up the steps, he acts like he trips. I was shaking my head, thinking what a crazy dad I had, but my friends all loved him (they even called him dad, too). We’d also have youth dances at church and my dad would come to pick us up. If he was a little early, my friends and I would drag him onto the dance floor and he’d dance with us.”

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!



Monday, August 06, 2007

Summer is over

Meagan and I enjoying a laugh as the last rays of sunlight disappear over the Gulf of Mexico.

Just back from the beach; we are now officially in love with Seaside, FL. Jill returned to work today and is expecting as many as 20 new students, the girls have one more week before classes begin, and I am down to the last five weeks before the book is due. Lots to do! See you tomorrow.

Friday, August 03, 2007

Post # 300!

I am searching for inspirational stories about father-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom, teach moral and important life lessons, and give others insight into how to nurture and maintain a healthy, loving and fulfilling father-daughter relationship.

If you are a father or a daughter, I want to hear about your parent-child relationship experiences. For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

Now on to today’s entry, sent to me by an admiring daughter…

“I remember how special my dad has always made me feel. As a child, it was very simple acts of love, and he probably didn't even realize the effect it has had on me. He would do things like coming home with a drink or snack and giving me the leftovers, or taking my hand and passing money or some little token gift to me. I never realized that he did the same things for my siblings until we were older and talked about childhood memories.

My father has always been and still is a jovial man. He always looks to the bright side of things. As an adult, I have had dealt with some trials that life throws at me. One time that has stuck with me is, several years ago, I was going through a really difficult time at my job, and was feeling really down and ready to give it up. I call home and my dad gives me the best advice. He tells me to keep my chin up, be happy, and to give 110%. He said that by doing this, my supervisors would realize the mistake they made. So, I follow his advice, and low and behold, after a month in a position I did not want, I was promoted to the position I wanted. I have learned much of my work ethics from him, and have been grateful of his example, because it has allowed me to excel in every job I have had.”

I had a good conversation with my editor yesterday and the book is beginning to come together. Check back on Monday for an update. Have a great weekend!

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Thursday, August 02, 2007

Just an opinion

I am searching for inspirational stories about father-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom, teach moral and important life lessons, and give others insight into how to nurture and maintain a healthy, loving and fulfilling father-daughter relationship.

If you are a father or a daughter, I want to hear about your parent-child relationship experiences. For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also collecting photos of dads and daughters to display on this blog. If you’d like to submit one, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

Now on to today’s diary entry…

A father's relationship with his daughter shapes who she will become. The father-daughter relationship is an important place, if not the most important place, for daughters to develop appropriate foundations for self-confidence and self-worth.

A daughter's relationship with her father is her very first male-female relationship. From that relationship, little girls develop their first impression of themselves as a female. Among all the emotions they might experience with their dads, at the very least they develop a sense of whether they are valued or discounted by men, and why. Daughters regard themselves as they think others regard them, especially her dad.

If a daughter receives plentiful affection and reassurance from her dad, she will mature into a woman with a healthy capacity to love herself and others. On the other hand, if a daughter isn’t given loving affection and reassurance by her dad, it is hard for her to believe a boyfriend, even a husband, when he tries to give her comfort and reassurance.

Too many dads mistakenly believe that if he isn’t a negative force in his daughter’s life, then he is in the alternative, a positive force. That belief is simply wrong. Being silent, and worse, indifferent, is being absent, and absence is just as negative and hurtful to little girls as is an insult.

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Wednesday, August 01, 2007

Open Skies

I am searching for inspirational stories about father-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom, teach moral and important life lessons, and give others insight into how to nurture and maintain a healthy, loving and fulfilling father-daughter relationship.

If you are a father or a daughter, I want to hear about your parent-child relationship experiences. For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also collecting photos of dads and daughters to display on this blog. If you’d like to submit one, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

Now on to today’s diary entry…

Today’s photo is one I took recently of Frank and his daughter for my new book, Daddy’s Little Girl. I had him running around quite a bit to get this photo, but he was a good sport about it. He, too, believes every daughter needs an active dad in her life. Cheers!

Here is another sample ( a slightly rewritten version of an earlier post):

“One daughter told me of how patiently her dad instructed her on how to put a live shrimp on a fishing hook. Did you know that shrimp have a central nervous system? I didn’t. But now I know that if you hook them just right, they still wiggle in the water. Thanks to that dad, I can’t eat shrimp without thinking I’m paralyzing the little critter as I bite into each one.

I’ve never taken Meagan fishing because she refuses to be an accomplice in the high crime of ramming a hook through the guts of a worm. To my surprise, though, it seems many dads and daughters have spent plenty of quality time snatching fish out of water. Well, most dads never really got a chance to fish. Instead, he baited hooks, untangling fishing lines, removed fish from hooks, and above all, kept his daughter safe from the danger of falling out of the boat.

Dads nearly always seem to be fascinated with the outdoors. Maybe we are all Eagle Scout wannabes, but for whatever reason, we eventually drag our daughters into the woods on a hike or camping trip.

Heather’s dad taught her plenty of things about nature. With a wild flower book in hand whenever they went for a ride in the Northern Arizona forest, he pointed out his favorite flora, an Indian Paint Brush or Lupine, and proclaim its beauty. Heather loved it whenever he wanted to stop for a moment of peace and quiet, perhaps to sit by a pond and just listen and admire what God had made. By her dad’s side, she, too, came to love nature.

Lynn told me about her fond memories of going camping with her older sister and their dad on top of a small mountain. He showed them how to set up their tent and cook on an open fire, and as night fell, they rested on their backs on a big blanket and watch the stars come out. Dad pointed out the constellations and they watched for shooting stars until both his girls grew sleepy. Settling into her sleeping bag for the night, Lynn remembers being frightened as she listened to the wind blowing through the trees, but then remembered her daddy was sleeping alongside of her. Comforted, Lynn closed her eyes and easily fell fast asleep. Today, years later, she thinks of that weekend all the time.


I don’t know if it is because dads transfer to their daughters some of the things he might have hoped to do had he had a son, or if dads want their daughters to understand that their world isn’t limited to lace and high tea just because she’s a girl, but either way, I’ve never met a daughter who would tell me of how much she hated being under the open sky with her dad.”

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!