Wednesday, April 30, 2008

Will They Know?

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.


For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If you’d like to submit a daughter-mom photo to display on this blog, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is August 1, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

Today’s photo is of my lovely neighbors, Sam and Reese. Poor things, I pester them into posing for me all the time. Bet you can guess why.

I’m really busy right now with the count down for the release of Daddy’s Little Girl. I’ve been filming a video clip about the book that I hope will be posted on Amazon.com and developing a pitch for a national morning show about things to do for dad on Father’s Day. Because of those time commitments, I haven’t written much in the last few days. Today I’m posting an unedited but poignant essay written by Amanda, a loving mom:

“I think about my mom and what I know about her and all I really know is she is my mom. I know I have heard numerous stories of her growing up, but all the stories I recall are of her being my mom. Know what I mean. So then I started thinking will my children really know me...

Will they know.... that I could spell photosynthesis in 2nd grade or that I won 1st place in the Science Fair for a paper and presentation I did on short people. That I took growth hormone to grow, will they know that. I took them for 4 years in grade school and proudly reached 5ft 2inches and without them was only projected to be 4 ft 3 inches. That I was so short my dad only filled our 4 foot pool up half way. That my parents took me, my sister and our grandparents on a 2 week cross country road trip to California in a minivan and all I really remember is Alcatraz and China town. Or that I hated my first year of high school and would cry at night, because I did not want to go. That even in high school my mom would rock me when I cried.

Will they know.... that I got scholarships to 4 universities for college, but went to the only school that did not offer me one. Or that in college I wrote a paper for a literary magazine and had it published. I also received my first F in college and disappointed my parents. That I lived in 6 different apartments during my 4 years in college. That somewhere in college my sister and I became friends instead of mortal enemies. Will they know that?

Will they know.... that by graduate school I straightened out and quit being so lazy as my college professors would say. That I was once engaged to someone other than their dad, but smart enough to know it would not work out and called off the wedding. Or that I met the man of my dreams while I was in grad school, their father. That one of my favorite haunts was Joe's bar, and that this is where their dad and I started dating. That the night we started talking and exchanged numbers, I hid roses that were sent to me by another guy in the beer cooler. Is this stuff they will know?

Will they know.... their dad surprised me with a trip to Disney World for my birthday while we were dating. And that their dad got down on one knee to propose to me in the rain in the city of New Orleans. That he got my father's permission before he asked me. Or that their dad and I lived together before we were married, but after we were engaged. That I wore a Vera Wang wedding dress at my wedding and never in my life felt more beautiful. That this was the 2nd dress I bought for the same wedding, and that I sold the first on the internet. That their grandmother bought me my veil and that I saved it in case they ever wanted to wear it or have their children wear it.

Will they know.... that the first house we ever bought is the same house I brought both of them home too. That together we decorated both of their rooms especially for them while we awaited their arrival. That at night their dad would read stories to them when they were in my belly and as babies and toddlers. That we have a special good night song that we sing each night. That I never worried so much in my life until I got pregnant for each of them. That I never ate cake until I got pregnant with them.

Will they know.... that being a mother was the hardest, most challenging and most fulfilling job I ever had. That I never dreamed it would be and it totally took me by surprise. Or that each night before I go to bed I pray that they will grow up to be happy and healthy and that they achieve all their dreams. And that secretly I do not want them to ever grow up and not need me.

Will they know all this about me? I hope so.”

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Monday, April 28, 2008

Kitchen Time


I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.

For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, http://www.gregoryelang.com/, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If you’d like to submit a daughter-mom photo to display on this blog, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is August 1, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

Today’s photo and art are from Kristin and Katie, who I interviewed and came to know last week.

Here is a short but sweet sample story that has been submitted for Mom’s Little Angel:

“The kitchen table was where Nell forged and improved upon her relationship with her daughter Yvonne. Everyday beginning in grade school and on through high school, when Yvonne came home the mother and daughter sat down at the table together and Nell asked questions about Yvonne’s day. It never mattered what Nell had been doing before Yvonne got home, she'd stop everything so that they could talk. She listened with interest to everything her daughter had to say, no matter how juvenile or silly it may have seemed at the time, believing that if the issue was important to her daughter, it should be important to her as well.

To Yvonne, time spent there in the kitchen at that round table made of teak wood, the one where her family gathered every evening to say the blessing and share a meal, was when she learned that even a child has thoughts and feelings of value. In the beginning they discussed which boys she liked, who didn’t reciprocate her admiration, and the things her friends might have said behind her back. As she grew older and more mature, they began to talk about college, marriage, faith and God. No matter what they talked about, having her mom’s time and ear instilled in Yvonne a sense of importance, and an understanding of what being a loving mom really meant.

Today day as Yvonne sits at that very same table, its place now in her own home, she remembers all those afternoons spent in earnest conversation with her mother. And when she looks up and sees her son sitting across from her in his highchair, she smiles, eager for their conversations to begin.”

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!


Friday, April 25, 2008

10 Days til Launch

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.

For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If you’d like to submit a daughter-mom photo to display on this blog, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is August 1, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

Wow, only 10 days before Daddy's Little Girl is out!

Today’s photo is of my cousin Susan and her lovely daughter Elizabeth, taken a few years ago and included in my book “Why a Daughter Needs a Mom.” I’ve never figured out if Elizabeth is my second cousin, a cousin once removed, or something else. If you know, please enlighten me.

Here is a paragraph from a story I’m working on at the moment. The story is about a friend of mine who lived with her aging mom for a few months while her usual caregiver was away. This is taken from a very rough draft but it is sweet nonetheless:

“But the best part about being with her mom again came late at night when she had finally tired, usually around 2:00 AM, and would agree it was time to go to bed. For it was then that the sometimes stubborn but sweet old woman, the dear loving mother who adored all her daughters, led Debbie to her old bed, tucked her in, and gave her a goodnight kiss before turning out the lights.”

More quotes I’ve taken from stories and emails about the power of Mother-Daughter love:

“I knew my daughter admired me but didn’t know just how much until she came home with a ‘Mom’ tattoo.”

“I no longer freak out at permanent marker on the walls or mascara and lipstick all over my cute daughters face. Instead, I laugh and grab my camera.”

“The truth is no matter how old you are or what you’ve accomplished in your life, you never stop wanting your mom.”

And this note from a dad who received an advance copy of Daddy’s Little Girl:

“It is a wonderful book and captures beautifully the heart beat of all fathers in love with their daughters.”

As well as this new review that was recently posted on barnesandnoble.com:

“This book brought many smiles to my mouth and tears to my eyes, and helped me remember what it was like being my daddy's little girl. My brother read it and told me that I was the best thing that ever happened to my dad-what a compliment!”

And that is just what I hope the book will do for Meagan and Linley when I am gone from this earth – remind them of just how much they meant to me. That is, after all, why I wrote it in the first place.

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Thursday, April 24, 2008

Language Barrier

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.

For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If you’d like to submit a daughter-mom photo to display on this blog, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is August 1, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

Rather than write about my books today, I am going to ask you for help. A friend of mine is a Korean woman who has recently been diagnosed with Lupus. She speaks English very well but cannot read it. All the Patient Education information that has been given to her is printed in English. I am trying to locate information written in Korean. I’ve spent hours on the phone with medical boards, local hospitals, the Korean General Consulate and others, but still nothing. If you happen to have a Korean friend too, one who can tell me where to obtain the information my friend needs, please send me an email with contact information. Thanks so much.

Wednesday, April 23, 2008

Three Generations

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.

For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, http://www.gregoryelang.com/, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If you’d like to submit a daughter-mom photo to display on this blog, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is August 1, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

Today’s photo, Three Happy Generations of moms and moms-to-be, courtesy of Tess Haddon from Hawaii.

I’d like to share a few paragraphs from a couple of stories I’ve been working on recently. The first is called Like Mom ~

Now, instead of remembering her mom as the woman who always said “No” and who was always right about everything no matter what the subject of the argument, Grace remembers the woman who tape recorded herself reciting math facts to leave next to her daughter’s pillow, believing listening to them while she fell asleep would help her in school. She remembers the woman who worked hard as the provider of her family and did so much for others before doing anything for herself.

Now whenever Grace thinks about her own daughter’s future she admits, to her surprise, to something she and her mother have in common: an overwhelming desire to protect their children regardless of the cost. Grace, too, has decided to teach her child how to do what is right and avoid that which is wrong. And although she hopes not to be too hard on her young daughter, she knows without reservation she will certainly be, like her mom was, hard enough.

Not long ago Grace found a long forgotten tape recorder. Curious, she clicked it on and listened. Goosebumps sprang up on her neck and arms when she heard her mother’s voice for the first time in fifteen years. When she had heard it all she recognized more clearly than ever that it was her mother who she had become. With tears in her eyes, she lovingly embraced the resemblance.

And this from Kitchen Time ~

Looking into the pot and seeing the onions had turned tender and translucent, Vanessa added garlic, a pinch of salt and gave the pepper mill a few good twists. Taste as you go, she remembered her mom’s words and dipped a spoon in to get a sample. Just right. And then she remembered the day when her mom had called her into the kitchen and announced it was time for the student to prepare a meal for the chef, without assistance. Mom wanted Gumbo, the very recipe Vanessa followed from memory on this day.

This test came in the late spring of her senior year of high school and amid making plans to leave home that summer to attend college. As Vanessa cooked with the occasional word of reassurance from mom, and once a little cough with a subtle shake of the head in disagreement about how much file’ powder to use, there was talk of independence, financial responsibility, and dealing with flirtatious young men. There was talk of the added responsibility that comes at the end of childhood and the beginning of adulthood, and reassurances that mom believed her daughter was prepared for them all.

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Tuesday, April 22, 2008

First Published Review

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.

For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If you’d like to submit a daughter-mom photo to display on this blog, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is August 1, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

Today’s photo is of the Powell family of Atlanta and it first appeared last year in my book “Thank You, Mom.”

I don’t have much to share today due to the time spent in interviews yesterday – three for this current writing project and one with a Cincinnati radio station which prerecorded an interview for Mother’s Day. Rodney, the host, his mother and I discussed why I wrote “Why a Son Needs a Mom.” I told them of my love for my mom and my desire to honor her with a book, but I didn’t tell them of how she would have whipped my B-hind had I not written a book about her after I had written one about everybody else in my family. Such prerogatives come after you’ve downloaded a 9 pound, 10 ouncer, I think.

Yahoo! Got my first reader’s review of Daddy’s Little Girl (posted on barnesandnoble.com):

“Daddy's Little Girl is an extremely uplifting and real life look at the relationships fathers have with their daughters. It is insightful and written in a way that both inspires and teaches. I would recommend this book to anyone who values their family relationships, especially fathers and daughters.”

Oh, and just to give a hint of things to come, here are a few short summaries of stories I’ve received recently:

1. A mom finds out she has cancer but insists her daughter leave home for college in pursuit of her dreams.
2. A mom does all she can to make every holiday special, including baking green bread for St. Patrick’s Day.
3. Dealing with her rebellious daughter, one mom finally understands what kept her own mother up at night.
4. While talking with her son over the kitchen table, a daughter recalls all the life lessons her mother taught while sitting at the very same table.
5. A daughter opens her lunchbox to find a special note from mom.

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Monday, April 21, 2008

Inside the 15

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.

For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If you’d like to submit a daughter-mom photo to display on this blog, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is August 1, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

Today’s photo is one I took last year of my beautiful neighbors, Mary and Lily. One of the benefits of being my neighbor is you get your picture taken all the time. One of the hazards of being my neighbor is you get your picture taken all the time. Anyway, the pollen season here has almost passed and the trees are more green than not, so I should begin scheduling models for the new book soon. I’m eager to get the camera gear out and be able to post new photos on this blog for you to enjoy.

Inside the 15, as in only 14 days until the release of Daddy’s Little Girl! I’ve gotten great feedback from reviewers and folks in the media who have received advance copies, even two tearful phone calls. It feels like I’m counting down the last few days before Christmas.

This blog is receiving over 100 visits a day. Thanks to you all who are telling your friends about my writing efforts. Just as Daddy’s Little Girl would never have come to be without dads and daughters sharing their stories, Mom’s Little Angel can’t either. As you know, I’m neither a daughter nor a mom, so I am relying on your help. Thanks to all of you who send stories each day or make time to be interviewed (I have two per day this week!).

I got this question the other day:

Can a submission be anonymous? I see that you require my name and email. Is it possible to submit the story another way without punching these things in or being interviewed?

I’m sorry but your story cannot be submitted to me anonymously. Not only do I need to follow-up with each story teller to gather additional information (and I do; some woman have already graciously put up with me sending a new email every time another questions pops into my head. Just ask Shelly.), but I need reasonable reassurance the story is true and not defamatory. I don’t get that reassurance if I were to permit you to submit stories anonymously. I hope you understand.

Tess Jannery, a toddler wise beyond her years, said this to her mother who pondered the question, What is nothing?: “There is no such thing as nothing because everything is everywhere."

And here’s another touching quote I pulled from a recent email:

“She wanted all her children to know how much she enjoyed being our mother, but we knew it without her having to tell us. How could we not, with all bike rides by the river, picnics with homemade brownies and tree climbing she did with us.”

And a reader who received an advance copy of the new book sent this email to me:

“I've only read 31 pages and had to stop as my eyes were brimming with tears. I believe you have succeeded in what you wanted to accomplish when you decided to write this book. I will continue to read it later, probably take a few days to finish it. I know that I will shed more tears but I probably will also laugh and giggle at some of the stories that you have so artfully applied to the pages of this book. I thanked you for writing Why a Daughter Needs a Dad and now I want to thank you for writing Daddy's little Girl.”

That's what I like to hear.

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Friday, April 18, 2008

Cultivating Love

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.

For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, http://www.gregoryelang.com/, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If you’d like to submit a daughter-mom photo to display on this blog, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is August 1, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

Today’s photo was sent to me by a daughter left with sad regrets. Her mom died at age 43 and before the two of them had resolved all their past troubles. The daughter said: “you never know when your mother's last day will be. It shouldn’t be as early as my mom’s was. I wish things would have been different.”

Ladies, if you are looking for a reason to tell your story, consider this – yours may be the one someone on the other side of the country finishes reading and says, “I want a relationship like that. I’m going to make things right.” And then she picks up the phone and calls her daughter or mom while there is still the time and opportunity to do so.

Now let me illustrate how a story may appear in the final book. The following is a draft – it has not been seen by my editor and it may change as I receive other stories that could complement it. This began as one daughter’s recollection of an afternoon working in the garden. After numerous emails in which I asked many questions (Thanks Shelby, for being so patient with me!), this story emerged:

One Saturday afternoon in early spring Shelby stepped outside to plant flowers in the garden. It was time to get the petunias and geraniums in the ground before the heat of summer arrived. Kneeling on the ground and reaching into the dirt to pull out weeds, she smiled at her eight year old daughter who worked willfully beside her.

As they worked together to prepare the flowerbed Shelby remembered the first time Madison had helped her in the garden. Only four years old at the time, wearing her own sun hat and using child-sized garden tools, the little girl sat in the dirt alongside mom and planted seeds. Every spring and fall since then they have worked side by side in the garden keeping seasonal color in their yard and enjoying the time spent together.

On this afternoon, after the weeds had been pulled and the soil loosened, Shelby dug the holes while Madison pulled the flowers from their plastic containers before placing each one in its own hole. Then together they filled in the holes and tamped the dirt down with their hands, chit-chatting nonstop as they worked. When they had planted all the flowers they sat back in the grass to admire their work and then laugh at their dirty hands.

Looking into Madison’s eyes Shelby remembered one warm and sunny Seattle afternoon nearly thirty years ago when her mother had shooed three children out of the house to help her work in the yard. For some time her mom had been planning to install a flower garden in the back yard and thought the task was the perfect activity to keep her small children occupied and out of trouble.

Moaning as they went, the siblings followed their mother into the yard. Shelby pulled weeds and spaded soil and listened with interest as her ever-cheerful mom told stories of her childhood, partly to distract her children from their work, but also, Shelby realized years later, because she so loved spending time with her young family.

One by one Shelby’s brother and sister grew weary of the work and wanted to leave the garden. Realizing it was turning into a hot day and thinking her children had worked long enough, mom said they could go back inside if they wished. Only Shelby remained in the garden, alone with mom and her desire to help finish the planting. They continued to work side by side and talked until nearly sunset. The job finally done, they stood back and admired their work – a circular bed of bright petunias and geraniums.


After the pair put away the tools and washed their dirty hands, mom praised her daughter for working so hard and staying with her until the end. “How can I reward you?” she asked.

All Shelby wanted was more time with her mom. She simply asked for a glass of lemonade and a walk together through the neighborhood. Holding hands and sipping occasionally from large, cold glasses of sweet lemonade, they walked past neighbors’ homes and admired their gardens but laughingly agreed theirs was the prettiest one around. When asked if she was tired Shelby answered no, she didn’t mind the hard work one bit. Mom squeezed her hand and said “Thank you for helping me today.”

Shelby smiled at Madison. “Which flowers do you like the best?” she asked.

“These,” Madison said, pointing to the petunias.

“Me, too!” Shelby responded, reaching out and rubbing her daughter’s knee. “Now let’s go wash up and have ourselves some lemonade.” She stood and taking Madison’s hand, led her toward the house.

“Thank you for helping me today,” Shelby said as they climbed the steps onto the porch, hoping her child would remember mother-daughter moments like these for as long as she would.”

You may ask why is this story well suited for Mom’s Little Angel? First, gardening is a perfect metaphor for building relationships. They must be cultivated to come to full bloom. Second, it is about tradition passed from generation to generation, something women have historically done to bring continuity to families, and third, it is about realizing parenting is as much about simple things and time spent together as anything else. Here petunias and lemonade will always mean more to these women than big parties and loaded shopping bags. In other words, it ain’t the pearl strands, my friends, it’s the heartstrings.

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Thursday, April 17, 2008

My Top Ten


I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.

For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, http://www.gregoryelang.com/, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If you’d like to submit a daughter-mom photo to display on this blog, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is August 1, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

Today’s wonderful photograph was loaned to me by Tess Haddon. That is she with her second daughter growing inside against the sunset somewhere in the Pacific Northwest.

I received these questions the other day and thought it best share the answers with all of you:

“Would I receive credit for my contribution (i.e. my name with my story)? Could you also explain the term “non-exclusive rights”? I understand the piece will be edited by you but what sort of length are you looking for? Is there a particular theme you want?”

There is no credit given for each story-teller because the story is not published as submitted. I retell all the stories in the voice of a single narrator, one who is combining similar stories and making observations about mother-daughter relationships in order to uncover an inspirational moral. It is best to think you are telling me a story over coffee that I will later use as an anecdote in a presentation about mother-daughter relationships. Do not approach this like a writing project, and keep in mind that you may elect to be interviewed to tell me about rather than write down your story.

Non-exclusive rights means I don't control your story at large as my intellectual property, just in the case of its use in my book. You remain free to use your story elsewhere in any manner of your choosing.

There are no length requirements. I've received great stories that were as few as 500 words, others exceeded 2000. Interviews have lasted anywhere from 10-60 minutes. I find the golden egg and work with it; you don’t need to try to make the story fit a theme. In fact, in a few cases the story that ends up in the book may not be the one you intended to tell, but instead the one I helped you discover along the way (it’s the old counselor in me, can’t shake it). My only request is that your story has a motivational and inspirational direction.

And to close this post with something just for fun, here are The Ten Things I Didn’t Know About Being a Fulltime (Male) Author:

1. All the sitting makes your arse flat.
2. The women in your neighborhood will think you’re the househusband of a well paid woman.
3. Your neighbors will harass you to run for President of the Homeowners Board because “you have the time.”
4. Your kids will leave you a To Do list, too.
5. Eventually one of the LOLs (Little Old Ladies) in the neighborhood will ask someone if you are gay, disabled or just out of work.
6. One afternoon you will think the postwoman has a crush on you.
7. Your wife will expect you to greet her at the door and have dinner on the table when she comes home from work.
8. You’ll get lots of “emergency” phone calls from friends and neighbors asking you to do something that “will just take a minute.”
9. You discover folding laundry is a welcome break from sitting at the desk staring at the keyboard.
10. Someone will eventually give you a tee shirt with the nickname (undeservingly, I must interject) “Gladys Kravitz” printed on the back.

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Wednesday, April 16, 2008

Baby-Toddler-Teen-Woman







IN tribute to my daughter who turns eighteen today, I’m posting a portion of the introduction to my first book, “Why a Daughter Needs a Dad,” along with a few photographs, most of which I’m sure to get in trouble for. Meagan was in the beginning and has remained a major inspiration for why I write. If not for her I wouldn’t be doing what I’m doing. Love ya girl! er, woman!

“I have known from a very early age that I wanted to be a father, and particularly the father of a daughter. I’m not sure that I really know why, but I have been certain that I would be blessed with a girl child. My heart has always melted when I held little baby girls or grew envious when I watched them as toddlers crawling into their father’s laps to cuddle. I’ve been touched while listening to women speak fondly of their fathers and moved by the grief of women who have lost their fathers. The love shared between a daughter and a father seemed to me to certainly be special, and was something I wanted very much to experience for myself.

When my wife told me she was pregnant I was overjoyed and quick to believe that the baby would indeed be a girl. Throughout the pregnancy I spoke of the baby as “her” or “she,” never as “it.” When I saw the first sonogram I could tell that our baby was a girl. Even though the doctor said it was too early to tell, I was convinced and thereafter believed my hopes and dreams about fatherhood were coming true. I was in the delivery room when she arrived. The first person she looked at was me. I was smitten instantly.

After the delivery an exhausted mother slept while Meagan Katherine and I bounded. She slept on my shoulder; her face nestled under my chin. We spent her first night in the world together, asleep in a big recliner. Today, nearly twelve years later, Meagan still lays her head on my shoulder and turns her face into my neck. I still pull her close and make sure no harm comes to her.

Over the years Meagan and I have done much together. We have daddy-daughter dates, she travels with me, and we play together, learn new things together and do sweet things for one another now and then. Sometimes we sit on my bed and look through the contents of the “Meagan Box,” a cardboard box overstuffed with pictures, her artwork, keepsakes and notes we have written to each other. In that box resides the reassuring evidence of our close relationship. Her mother and I divorced years ago and Meagan lives with me half time. During the weeks that she is with her mother, I go to that box often. For a long time I have wanted to capture those memories and put them together in some form to give to Meagan, to reassure her that when we are not together, that I think of her and I love her.

With the same certainty that I had about having a daughter, I have also been certain that the relationship Meagan and I have would be a changing one. I knew, and people told me, that one day she would be a little less affectionate, more interested in friends, less entertained by me, and that she might perhaps even find me embarrassing. It has surely come to pass. Now when I take her to school, she kisses me good-bye, and never on the lips, before we leave the house. I may not listen to my music from the moment the car enters school territory. I am to keep both hands on the wheel, my gaze fixed straight ahead. I should wave just at other parents, and only if they wave first. If I must say, “I love you”, it is to be nearly whispered, and never if the car door is open. Sometimes I go to the Meagan Box to reassure myself.

When I first began this book I intended to create a different kind of “how to” book, a book daughters could give to their fathers to tell them what they wanted from them. I sat and thought of the things my daughter and I have done together. I remembered what my father had done with my sister, and my uncles with my cousins. I asked Meagan for some ideas. Then I wrote it all down. The first time I read what I had written I saw a list of what a daughter might ask her father to do for her (just as I had planned). The second time I read it I saw a list of all that I hope to do for my daughter. The third time I read it I saw myself telling Meagan that she would change but never outgrow me. When I read it the fourth time, I knew I was holding the Meagan Box.”

To read more about my sweet young woman, my precious gift and dream come true, please turn to page 1 of Daddy's Little Girl.





Tuesday, April 15, 2008

Mommy Magic

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.

For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If you’d like to submit a daughter-mom photo to display on this blog, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is August 1, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

Today’s photo is of Lynn Dale and her oldest daughter; it appeared last year in “Thank You, Mom,” (a great Mother’s Day present, if you haven’t decided what to get your mom!). I thought it a fitting photo to accompany the tributes to moms I have received recently. Below are just a few.

One new mom wrote to me recently to tell me how, now with a child of her own, she appreciates her own mother so much more than she did. She says:

“So here is to my mom, for losing sleep all those nights, for changing a gazillion diapers (which, by the way, were not disposable), for getting barf on her clothes and baby food in her hair, for never throwing me out the window when I would not stop crying, and for all the things I am yet to be truly thankful for. Things like science projects and prom and holding my hair when I had the stomach flu and catching the chicken pox from me and not holding it against me. And now, for loving my son and dropping everything to ride down to the hospital with me when he bashes his head open. For being there, at the drop of a hat, whenever I need her.”

Another daughter told me of a conversation she had with her mom one night after having spent a long afternoon with her toddler:

"You know, it was the way it's supposed to be, right down to the final moments of the day. She cuddled up to me and we talked until she fell asleep on my chest. It was just so sweet."

Her mom laughed. "Sweetheart," she said, "How it's supposed to be only happens often enough to get you through the 99% of the time when it is not.”

Finally, another daughter sent this:

“My mom was a stay at home mom. Growing up, I remember knowing that when I came home from school she was going to be there. It provided a sense of security for me. I remember one day in particular. When I was in the 4th grade, my best friend was accidently killed over the weekend. My teacher told the class the news that Monday morning. I held in my emotions until I got home from school. I could not wait to get home so that I could tell my mom because I knew she would be there for me, to help me understand and make things better.

By her not working outside the home, we did not have a lot of things other kids had. I realize now she put me far above her own needs and wants. I recently became a mother and I am striving to be the same kind of mother she was.”

I’m delighted to be trusted to share these tributes. Please keep them coming.

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Monday, April 14, 2008

21 days to go!

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.

For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, http://www.gregoryelang.com/, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If you’d like to submit a daughter-mom photo to display on this blog, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is August 1, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

Only 21 days until the release of Daddy's Little Girl! I gave Meagan an advance copy to read during her Spring Break; when she returned home I learned she had only read five of the 65 stories. When asked why she hadn't read more she answered swiftly and truthfully - "I was feeding starving children in an orphanage." Kinda hard to argue with that. Gosh, my baby turns 18 on Wednesday.

Today’s photo is one I snapped while at the beach last week. See how cold they are? It’s mid-April in the south and we have a freeze warning tonight. Mr. Gore, give back that Oscar.

This is an excerpt from a sweet and insightful story sent to me by Violette DeSantis, a writer for Bellaonline.com. Thanks Violetter for your contribution:

“And oops, now before you know it she is a teen with two younger sisters. Oh, she’s nothing special, I have to treat her the same as her sisters and all (wink), except in my heart.

And that is where my dilemma used to lie, in my heart. I’ve heard tell that you love all your children the same, but I don’t believe that. I believe you love them the same amount, but I also believe you love them differently. For seven years she had been an only child, then we had to love another and then another. I certainly believe my love multiplied, but I also have learned different things about the love I have for each girl.”

And this from a loving and wiser, more mature daughter:

“It always surprises me to hear that not every girl-woman has a great relationship with her mother. I’ve always had an excellent relationship with my mother, unless you count the time I wrote in big, bold letters “I hate my mother” in permanent black marker on the wall at the top of our stairs. I think I did that because I was grounded from going to a dance or something and my mother says that even three coats of paint didn’t cover it up.” But lots of love made it disappear, didn’t it?

And Liz Heugly said: “I always saw my mother kneeling by her bed at night saying her prayers and knew that she was praying for me just like I am always praying for my children.” Amen to that.

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Friday, April 11, 2008

TGIF

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.

For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If you’d like to submit a daughter-mom photo to display on this blog, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is August 1, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

Today’s photo is of Jan Stubbs and her mom. It first appeared in Why a Daughter Needs a Mom, my fifth book that serves as inspiration for Mom’s Little Angel just as Why a Daughter Needs a Dad did for Daddy’s Little Girl.

A quote taken from an interview I conducted yesterday – “My mother has been my biggest fan my entire life.” Thank you Rosemary! Your story will be a tear-jerking crowd pleaser, I’m sure.

BTW, Shad. If "we are NOT getting a dog!" is your most often stated protest said as one husband to his wife, then we might be related. At least we are in spirit. I, who married a woman who came with a dog, say more often than I can count, “THAT is our last dog!” Don’t give in brother, because it won’t end with the dog. Then there will be special bedding, toys and seasonal outfits.

Ever seen Ace of Cakes on the Food Network? There is a similar bakery here that Meagan wants us to use for making the cake for her graduation party. For a mere $175 I could get a cake shaped like UGA’s Sanford Stadium and if that weren’t enough school spirit I could also have one shaped like the mascot, Uga, but they wouldn’t give me a quote for that one over the phone. Must have something to do with their liability insurance.

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Thursday, April 10, 2008

Vitamin L

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.

For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, http://www.gregoryelang.com/, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If you’d like to submit a daughter-mom photo to display on this blog, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is August 1, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

Today’s photo is of my friend Jeanine and her mom, taken just outside Lincoln center in NYC. Jeanine is a Health Counselor (http://www.jeaninefinelli.com/) who advises we all get an ample daily dose of Vitamin L – Love – for with it good things happen for your mind, body and spirit! I’ll have two, please.

Here are a few more profound sentences lifted from daughter-mom stories I received recently:

“When it came time to deliver my child, I wanted nobody but my mom. She was the only one who knew what I was going through. She was the one who held my hand and told me everything would be okay.”

“I never thought I would be good at being a mother, but the moment I looked at my newborn daughter’s face I knew I would do anything and everything for my beautiful baby.”

“It didn't matter what time she went to bed, it seemed mom was always first up and making breakfast before we even knew it was morning.”

If you want to send a story but are wondering what to write about, here are five topics that have yet to be touched upon:

1. The birds and the bees talk
2. A daughter or mom caring for the other who is dying
3. A mom who helps her daughter overcome a shortcoming to be a better person
4. A daughter teaches her mom a new skill that then opens new doors
5. A daughter witnesses the strength of her mother’s character

And of course there are many others. Please feel free to ask me about your idea if you wish before committing time to write it or participate in an interview.

Thanks to those of you who have left encouraging comments on previous blog posts. It really helps me along to read of your support for my project as well as to have evidence you really do read the blog!

The early indicators of the success of Daddy’s Little Girl are promising! Nearly twenty media sources have already asked for review copies and today my publicist is sending copies of the book to key contacts in her Rolodex. I’ve been invited to participate in a radio interview and have another book signing scheduled. I’m rubbing the genie lamp and crossing my fingers – could this book be the one?

Linley returns home tonight from her mission trip; she has been working in a retirement center in Virginia for five days. Meagan returns home Friday night from her mission trip to the orphanage in Mexico. Love those girls, and proud of them both. Can’t wait for the rattle and hum that goes along with having them home again!

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Wednesday, April 09, 2008

Daddy's Little Girl is here!

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.

For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If you’d like to submit a daughter-mom photo to display on this blog, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is August 1, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

Today’s photo was loaned to me by the Harris family, who are the center of a sweet little story about little girls reminding mom you never get to old for a good day of dress-up and tea parties.

I got my hands on an advance copy of Daddy’s Little Girl! It is such a lovely book and I am very proud of it. It was Meagan who found the envelop at the door late Friday night; we four sat on the couch and looked through it together. It made me happy to see the girls laugh as they recalled some of the stories I had told in the book. Meagan had to be at the airport early Saturday morning for her mission trip to Mexico and took a copy with her, promising to read it on the plane or during her relaxation time at the orphanage. I can’t wait to see her when she returns Friday night and hear what she thinks. Stay tuned.

Well as you can see Jill and I are back from our brief excursion to the South Carolina coast. For the third time in a row my beach photo plans were rained out – it seems whenever I get within five miles of the Atlantic a storm front moves in. It was so bad a beach wedding had to be moved inside on Sunday. When it wasn’t raining it was cold so I’m doubtful I can use the shots I managed to take; the daughters and mom were so bundled up their expressions were lost behind their hoods. Such is the willfulness of nature I guess.

I have lots of email to catch up on and new stories to read. Thanks for stopping by and I’ll be back to normal daily updates tomorrow.

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Saturday, April 05, 2008

Wife and Baby Girl

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.

For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If you’d like to submit a daughter-mom photo to display on this blog, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is August 1, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

Today’s photo is of my lovely wife and Baby Girl (Linley, also known as LD) taken in the middle of a “Mom, I want to give you a makeover” session one night last year. This photo also appears in my book “Thank You, Mom.” I avoided a makeover that night, remembering a time years ago when Meagan gave me a makeover and then I went to work the next day wearing stick-on earrings. They didn’t even match my suit.

Meagan and I had lunch together Friday, my way to see her before she headed to Mexico for her third mission trip to an orphanage down there. As I always do when I’m in a public place, I used the time to scout for potential models to pose for Mom’s Little Angel. I spotted several lovely daughter-mom combinations and handed out my card with an explanation of this project. Meagan calls it pimping myself out. Funny, I thought it was earning a living so I could afford her allowance.

Speaking of work, here are a few nuggets I pulled from two recently submitted stories:

“I am the mother of an 18-month-old baby girl. Every day is new and exciting because my daughter learns and does something new that makes me think my life is only just beginning.”

…and this came near the end of a heart touching story I am eager to share in the book:

“I’ve realized that one of the best things my mom left behind are her traits. I’ve come to love the fact that she and I have the same nose, chin, and hands. I love the fact that we have the same Flintstone feet. She gave them to me. And I am reminded every day that a little piece of her lives on with me.” Wow.

Jill and I are headed out of town for a few days. I have a book signing event and some mother-daughter playtime on the beach photos scheduled, so there will not be a new post until Wednesday morning. Check back then please!

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Friday, April 04, 2008

Battered and Badgered

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.
For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If you’d like to submit a daughter-mom photo to display on this blog, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is August 1, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

Today’s photo is of a mom and her daughters who live in my neighborhood. This pic first appeared in “Thank You, Mom,” which appeared on book store shelves about this time last year. Checking in on her sleeping babies – just like every mom in the world would.

I had great interviews yesterday with daughters who told me of mothers who inspired faith in God, how one mom inspired her daughter to be her own person no matter what convention dictated, and a mom who demonstrated selfless love by shaving her head when her sister went through chemotherapy and cared tirelessly for a husband with Alzheimer’s Disease. I can’t thank you all enough for helping me by sharing your touching, personal stories.

I’ve been joining online communities that were intended for moms only in an effort to get the word out about seeking stories for Mom’s Little Angel. I’ve gotten some strange responses to my request for membership from a few. I suppose I should have suspected it – it’s hard to tell who’s a pervert and who isn’t on the Internet. But thanks to www.MississippiMoms.com and www.CafeMoms.com I’ve been able to reach thousands of readers. I just hope someone writes back!

This is my life as a battered and badgered dad:

Why does it upset the girls so much if when I agree enthusiastically with a point they’ve made I shout “Boomshockalocka!”

Meagan and Linley are both going to formal dances next month so the need for fancy dresses arose. Both needed alterations. As I stood there in disbelief that these young women were once lap-sitters and overheard them saying things like “take it in here” and “shorten it this much” I couldn’t help myself when I yelled “Hell no, cover that up!”

Meagan had a half-day today at school and is sitting near me chatting and having lunch as I work. We were just discussing how often I would see her after she left for college and whether or not a futon was a good purchase for her dorm room. When I realized I could use it to stay overnight, perhaps even host a book signing in her room, she threw a boiled egg at me.

Meagan’s questions for the day – what is the longest uninterrupted fart on record (she’s convinced there is such a record somewhere) and how do they make a penis from a vagina (she understands the penis to a vagina conversion), a subject that is apparently on Oprah tomorrow and she thinks I should watch it. Why, I dare not ask. What else is on the mind of a high school senior?

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Thursday, April 03, 2008

The Trouble With Spring

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.

All stories must be submitted or interviews completed by August 1, 2008.

For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, http://www.gregoryelang.com/, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also collecting photos of moms and daughters to display on this blog. If you’d like to submit one, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

Now on to today’s post:

Today’s photo is one I took for this book. It is of my lovely neighbor Allison and her mom Alicia. And the wild child’s name is Tazz. Believe me, that name is an appropriate description. He’s also known as Momma’s Boy, which is just as fitting.

Another quote I lifted from a recently received letter:

“We had our troubles but I loved my mom more than anything. There was that special bond I couldn’t explain, and I couldn’t ignore it or deny it, either.”

Love explains it best, doesn’t it?

Please remember ladies, you shouldn’t pass on this opportunity to write or tell a daughter-mom story just because your daughter is a tot. Let’s not forget you are a daughter too and your mom probably had a lot to do with raising you!

Not much to post today – I have several interviews lined up which I must prepare for and I’m a little behind on my To-Do List due to excessive socializing last night. Jill and I walk the three-mile route through our neighborhood each day and last night, an evening blooming with Spring, we stopped eight times to visit with other good folks who were out enjoying the evening. Our last visit was on Tazz’s front porch and he opened two bottles of wine. I tell you, he’s a trouble maker.

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Wednesday, April 02, 2008

Love Conquers

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.
For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also collecting photos of moms and daughters to display on this blog. If you’d like to submit one, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

Now on to today’s post:

Today’s photo was loaned to me by Jessica Casselman and her girls Elle, Chloe and Kyler. Here’s a link to their family blog: http://casselmanfamily-hope.blogspot.com/

I’ve been asked to elaborate on what sort of story I’m looking for. Here goes:

A Mom’s Little Angel story is an inspirational story about ordinary people sharing brief moments or a long history together that warms the heart and causes the reader to think of ways to improve their own daughter-mom relationship. A Mom’s Little Angel story is a simple tale that is personal and appeals to the feel good emotions. It may begin and end with positive messages, or it may begin with pain and conflict but end with reconciliation and forgiveness, or begin with tragedy but end in triumph. Stories that prove hope conquers despair and unconditional love conquers mistakes and separation are what this book shall be about.

Please tell me your story with a moral in mind. What do you want others to learn from you? A story without a life lesson cannot be used in the book. That means a tribute or sweet reminiscence will not likely make the cut. If you have any questions or doubts about your story, send me an email, ask me to call you and we’ll discuss it. I’ve helped others find the heart of their stories; I’m sure I can help you too!

Let me end with a quick example. Just yesterday I interviewed a sober drug addict, released convict and loving mom who had been separated from her daughter for many years while in prison. All she had to remind her of her little girl was a photo taken at a big box store when the child was only three years old. All she had to keep her going was the hope she would see her daughter again one day, even if it were to hear the child say that she hated her mom for not being there for her. They found each other one afternoon on the Internet. I’ll save the rest for the book, but let me reassure you, it ends well, it ends sweetly.

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Tuesday, April 01, 2008

Quotes, Gas and Dessert

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.
For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also collecting photos of moms and daughters to display on this blog. If you’d like to submit one, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

Today’s photo was provided to me by my new friends Krista and Shelli, and their mom of course.

I drafted three stories yesterday and have two interview appointments today so haven’t much to share with you. Other than these sweet quotes I’ve collected (I scatter them between chapters throughout the book):

“She knows exactly when I am about to get angry and that’s when she looks at me with her cute smile and says, ‘Watch it! You are becoming like your mother again!’”

“I hope my daughters will come home when all of our husbands are away so that we can still have ‘Girls Night’ once in a while.”

“I pray every day for patience; my mother dries me crazy!”

“When I tuck my sweet girls into bed each night I remember how very blessed I am.”

“Mother-daughter bonding time always brings a smile to my heart and tears to my eyes.”

“To see the smile on her face when she opens her eyes and sees me in the morning is the best part of my day.”

“Mom is my rock. ‘nough said.”

On other notes – it cracks me up how often someone comments on Facts #7 & 8; it seems so many can relate or admit to similar conduct. Dr. Phil says every marriage needs a hero. I agree but go one step farther – every marriage needs a prankster, too.

And in conclusion, I confess (thanks to Karen Virga) there is a new love in my life – pannacota! My mouth waters just typing the word! Dear Lord give me strength; I don’t want to regain the twelve pounds I’ve lost since New Year’s Day.

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!