Saturday, May 31, 2008

Sand and Flip-flops

We are going on vacation! Please check in again beginnning June 9th for updates on the progress of Mom's Little Angel and news about Daddy's Little Girl!

Thursday, May 29, 2008

Wednesday, May 28, 2008

Candles

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.

For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If you’d like to submit a daughter-mom photo to display on this blog, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is August 1, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

Today’s photo is of Lisa Brodsky and her mom at Mom’s western wedding. Mom has passed away and Lisa has turned poet, documenting her mother’s live and memory in verse. Here is a selection she shared with me:

Candles

“When I got off the phone with my step-father, his voice hoarse and scared, when I let the fact of my mother’s death settle on the first layer of my brain, I instinctively lit all the candles in the room.

I didn’t cry. I breathed shallowly and shakily struck a match and lit the first candle. A bit more frantically, I lit the candles surrounding her picture. Have some light, Mom. Have all the light I can give.

Suddenly, before the tears, before the full realization of an appendage cut off, lost to the tides, my room flickered with all the light I could conjure up. Perhaps I wanted to see her; light reveals faces which were previously hidden. No, I wanted to light her way; whatever road she was on I wanted her to see her way. Did I want to hold onto her so much that I kept the road back to the living lit? No, I loved her more than that. I knew, in the well of my subconscious, that I would have to let her go, let her walk her own path to the Otherworld.

So the real reason why I lit those candles was to treat her like the Goddess she was. A tea light on each side of her, leading her to the Light. But as the tears began to show up like rushed party guests, I said Mom, Mommy, just don’t forget me in the dark.”

Powerful, I think one must agree.

And then Tonja Trump sent this little musing:

“I always have to write it down if I want to remember it.I can’t remember the kids’ sports schedules. Thank goodness those are printed out for me; they find their home on the bulletin board and my desk at work. I guess repetition is good for the soul as well as the memory.Yet I can always remember silly irrelevant things, like those reddish-orange plaid pants that my mom dressed me in during the 1970’s. She STILL says they were in style back then. And I still beg to differ.”

Please visit Suite101.com to see an article about Daddy’s Little Girl, written by Maryan Pelland. Click here: http://newsmaker-interviews.suite101.com/article.cfm/langs_father_daughter_books_sell

Jill and I are taking Baby Girl to Wise, VA, today to begin orientation at the mission camp where she is working this summer, thus I doubt I’ll be able to write more this week. Please check back in the morning for new photos taken of mothers and daughters for Mom’s Little Angel.

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Tuesday, May 27, 2008

One Foot Out of the Nest






Our house decorated in BullDawg Best, a delicious UGA Peach cake, my beautiful graduate and GA bound daughter, and the three wonderful women in my life. I’m so blessed!

Sunday, May 25, 2008

Milestones in our home!




Each girl recently had a graduation event - Linley from middle school and Meagan from high school. These are a few photos of our girls/hams. Tomorrow, pictures from the HS graduation party.

Friday, May 23, 2008

Thursday, May 22, 2008

Redux

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.

For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If you’d like to submit a daughter-mom photo to display on this blog, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is August 1, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

Sidney had this to say about her beloved but departed mom:

“The greatest tribute we have since given her is our own families. My six sisters and I feel it our greatest gift of life to have had the luxury to all be "stay at home" Mothers. Between us we have raised 58 children. Not a bad one in the bunch!” Wow.

I am working diligently to finish the first draft of Mom’s Little Angel in the next ten days so am not taking much time to write for this blog right now. For that reason I will be posting some old material for a few days, beginning with this portion of an interview I participated in last year as Daddy’s Little Girl was getting ready for press:

1. Name the two people—living or dead—you would most like to invite to dinner at your house. What would you discuss?

Benjamin Franklin and Pablo Picasso. They both changed the way people look at the world. I’d like to know what was on their minds when they began to realize the impact and reach of their labors.

2. Of the seven deadly sins (pride, envy, gluttony, lust, anger, greed, and sloth) which one is the hardest for you to resist?

Gluttony – I’m a fool for foie gras, traditional Japanese sushi, Shiraz, and my wife.

3. If you could live in another time and place, where and when would that be?

In Independence Hall, in Philadelphia in 1776. What it must have been like to change the world with the simple signing of your name.

4. Who is your oldest friend?

If you mean oldest in duration, then my cousin, Jeff, who is ten days older than me. We began life living next door to one another. If “oldest” is as in old fart, then my dad, who is 72. We share the same birthday.

5. What do you consider to be your first piece of writing?

My dissertation, wherein I concluded women are more powerful in relationships than men. Just the other night while watching Dr. Phil (my wife’s decision) Jill said:

“You’re the head of our household.”
“I don’t rule over you,” I responded.
“Exactly,” she said, “that’s why I let you be in charge.”

See what I mean?

6. What do you find most rewarding about being an author?

It gives me the opportunity to be at home with the girls after school and all summer. Of course sometimes that’s a pain in the butt, too.

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Wednesday, May 21, 2008

Granddaddy Long Legs

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.

For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If you’d like to submit a daughter-mom photo to display on this blog, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is August 1, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

Today’s photo is of my friend Andrea and her girls; it first appeared in my book, “Thank You, Mom.”

I’m certain I will get lots of grief for posting this without permission (like the husband in the TV commercial says, “I lead but only where she wants to go,” except in my case there are three shes) but here goes:

Jill is known as the “Fraidy Cat” in our home. She is the one who when riding the Ferris Wheel on the Santa Monica Pier was white knuckled holding onto the handrail with her eyes closed before the ride started and her teeth clinched so tight I’m still surprised she didn’t break a molar. “It’s not safe!” she shouted while Meagan, Linley and I laughed during the entire ride, taking turns rocking the seat to see who could elicit the loudest mommy scream.

She’s afraid of bugs, too, especially Granddaddy Long Leg spiders. Once while attending a family reunion picnic at a state park, Jill needed to use the public bathroom. Before she would venture into it, however, I had to inspect it for these spiders. My family howled as our daughters stood guard outside the women’s bathroom while I ventured inside and looked in all the nooks and crannies for the offending spider. Finding none, I announced that the facilities were indeed pest free. Jill, her anxiety put to rest, rushed inside for a much needed visit.

Approximately eight seconds later, the loudest glass breaking scream anyone has ever heard penetrated the steel door and concrete walls of the bathroom. The door burst open and Jill rushed out, her feet not touching the ground, still trying to fasten her pants as she sailed through the air like a hunger crazed jungle cat leaping onto some innocent but tasty Easter bunny.

“There was one on the ceiling,” she managed to say between gulping breaths when we finally caught up with her nearly 200 yards later.

So you can image my surprise when I asked Linley and Jill to share a story for this book and Jill suggested they tell me about a mother and daughter camping trip they took one weekend before Jill and I met. As far as I knew, Jill thought camping meant sleeping in a state of the art RV parked alongside the pool of a nice hotel with a noteworthy restaurant and spa inside.

Now Linley is quite the opposite of her mom – she is fearless. Knowing she had a long history of daredevil stunts resulting in broken bones and the need for stitches, I suspected I would need to employ my nursing skills on a few occasions after our family was formed. I had no idea I would be in an emergency room four times before our first wedding anniversary.

Linley has attended the same summer camp for years, sometimes staying for a month at a time and learning archery, riflery, repelling, canoeing, and how to build a fire without the convenience of matches. She doesn’t mind sleeping under the stairs, sharing a cold spring water shower with her campmates or brushing her teeth with a stick.

Jill, on the other hand, wouldn’t touch a stick unless two independent observers testified under oath there wasn’t and never had been a Granddaddy Long Leg spider on, near or even thinking about the stick.

Nevertheless, daughter and mom arrived at base camp one afternoon and proceeded to settle in. To Jill’s relief, the sleeping accommodations were a rustic cabin with bunk beds, not a tent. The first order of business after Linley searched the cabin for spiders was to sign up for the various activities offered. Linley selected archery and canoeing, and taking pity on her mother, also selected two classes, basket weaving and birdhouse building. On a whim, she completed her choices by signing up for the “The Pamper Pole” activity.

When Jill inquired about the last item on their list, Linley remarked, “Mom, how bad can it be with the word ‘pamper’ in the name?” Made sense.

The first day of mommy-daughter camping activities passed without a hitch. Jill and Linley enjoyed a morning of archery, Linley hitting the bull’s eye a few times and Jill finally managing to launch her arrow and have it stick in the ground halfway to the target. They also finished the day with a grass basket and brightly painted but somewhat oddly shaped birdhouse.

Jill fell asleep that night with a feeling of accomplishment, thinking the most difficult of her camping activities were behind her. Just how challenging could gliding on a lake in a canoe and something that involved pampering actually be, she reasoned.

The next morning Linley led her mother along a wooded path toward the Pamper Pole. Rounding a bend and approaching a clearing in the trees, Jill looked forward in horror. Straight ahead was a telephone pole sticking up in the ground. It stood somewhere between thirty and one-hundred feet tall, depending on who you ask. With tiny hand holds nailed onto the pole, a small platform on top and a rope dangling down, all thoughts of being pampered evaporated from Jill’s mind.

Before she could scream, “Don’t, it’s not safe!” Linley had strapped on a safety harness and scampered like a squirrel to the top of the pole. Jill’s heart stopped as Linley leapt straight out off the platform, grabbed a trapeze bar and performed a few circus acrobatics before descending to the ground. Jill, shaking like a leaf and nearly crying with fear, meet her daughter as her feet finally touched the ground. “I can’t do it,” Mom said over and over again.

“Yes you can,” Linley urged and somehow managed to convince her mother to give the pole a try. This is the point in the story at which the mother’s and daughter’s tales diverge. They cannot agree on how long it might have taken Jill to climb the pole and to steady herself at the top on the little platform. They cannot agree on how far out she leapt or by how much she missed the trapeze bar. They can’t even agree on how loudly she screamed on the way down or for how long after she was standing safely on the ground. All they can agree on is, yes, Jill did it, just like Linley said she could.

Later in the day mother and daughter slipped onto the lake in a canoe, Jill up front and Linley in back taking charge of steering (she, unlike Jill, had taken this class once before). At first they glided effortlessly along the water, but soon Jill noticed she was pulling hard against her oar and going around the lake in a wide circle. Looking over her shoulder, she found Linley with her head down on her arms folded across her knees, sound asleep.

Jill managed to get the canoe back to shore all by herself, all along the way peering into the water on the watch for snorkeling spiders. That night she slept well in her own bed, and deservedly with a genuine feeling of accomplishment for her two feats that day.

And Linley carries with her the knowledge her mother will face and overcome her fears on her daughter’s behalf.

Monday, May 19, 2008

Letting Go

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.

For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, http://www.gregoryelang.com/, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If you’d like to submit a daughter-mom photo to display on this blog, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is August 1, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

Today’s photograph originally appeared in the Spanish translation of my book Why a Daughter Needs a Mom.

Take a look at what HarperOne and Amazon.com have done with my Amazon page. Click the “Read a letter” hyperlink next to my photo, just to the bottom right corner of the book cover image:

http://www.amazon.com/Daddys-Little-Girl-Stories-Daughters/dp/0061451495/ref=sr_1_18?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1204743987&sr=1-18

A mom shared this with me recently; her thoughts on watching her daughter grow and go:

“It is time to let her go. She is going after God. What more could a mother desire? I know it is good and right, but my heart aches. My baby is going to spread her wings and I won't be there to witness it.All of her life has been leading up to this. I always knew this was a possibility. She had talked of missions work as a young child, wanting to be a veterinarian missionary, who cared for the people's animals while she told them about Jesus. Yes, she was a very creative child.....still is.As we stood worshipping in church out of the corner of my eyes I saw her surrendering her life to be a beautiful display of God to others. With my hand upon her head and my heart praying her release, God came, for both of us. We held each other close, she wept, tears filled my eyes as I tried to retain some composure, for fear I would surely cry the "ugly cry" in a room full of people.You know no one told me about this part. I mean I knew that you let go and everything. After all I don't live with my parents anymore. I left home... So I know it is a natural part of life. But I never knew it hurt like it does.... In just a blink of an eye, time has moved in warp speed and those little ones are leaving home to live their own lives. I didn't know when I had toddlers that life would move into warp speed.”

And then this musing from a daughter:

“We don't understand each other very well and our relationship has been a gigantic learning experience for both of us. But I think when people go through the relationship wringer like we did, one of two things happen. People break away. Or people hold on to the one thing that can't be broken. She's my mom. I'm her daughter. For better or worse; we're tenuously building on that now.

I'm married now and have a four year old stepson. It has done great things for our mother/daughter relationship. I get how busy and overloaded moms and wives are, and how not every decision made by a mom is a good one. She sees that I am a real, live grownup, just trying to do the best for my own family. Living among men only has made the women in my life more important overall. Men will never understand me the way another woman can.

And I really believe that someday, no woman will understand me the way that my mom will.”

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Friday, May 16, 2008

Lessons

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.

For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If you’d like to submit a daughter-mom photo to display on this blog, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is August 1, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

Violette DeSantis of BellaOnline: The Voice of Women recently reviewed Daddy’s Little Girl and had this to say:

“Gregory E. Lang is a dad and a stepdad. He is a man who loves his family and daughters. To peruse a Lang book is like driving by one of those big old country houses with a big porch and a rocking chair. You must sit a spell and visit.”

Now I think that’s a fine compliment! Thanks Violette!

To read the entire review, please visit her page at http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art35744.asp

The following is the story Violette shared with me for Mom’s Little Angel; enjoy:

“We don’t pick our lessons.

Motherhood is a blessing, unique in each turn. Every child brought forth into this world brings something different to the table. I’ve had the opportunity to have three daughters and overall I’ve learned that we don’t get to pick our lessons in life. I’ve had to learn something new with each one. After two preemies, and the last that came exactly on time to the day, anything can happen and I suspect it affects your relationship down the road whether you think it or not.

For the most part, I’ve learned the hard way that they come when they’re ready. No expectant mother or even trained doctor can always stop that from happening. My first experience at motherhood was with Cristina Joy. Cristina came ten weeks early, and so began the relationship.

I called her my Yoda, you know, because of the way she was all wrinkly and not like the other babies. I didn’t want to leave her in the hospital but I remember the NICU doctor firmly telling me that she was a preemie who was going to be all right. Boy, he should thank God that he was right because that was the word as far as I was concerned. That was my baby girl there and she was going to be all right.

The next obstacle I faced was her first little baby book. Her first five weeks with leads hanging from her to be attached here and there to noisy machines with flashing lights. It was awkward to consider showing people her baby pictures. I snapped right out of that fast and decided, it was my baby, these are her pictures, and there is nothing wrong with her.

I can’t tell you how many ups and downs there were. Things I would brush off and distance myself from kind of. I did not think really how it impacted my life. I was definitely on autopilot. We saw specialists for this, that and the other thing…just to make sure they were dotting their i’s and crossing their t’s, I suppose.

Soon she was no different than any other baby. And oops, now before you know it she is a tween with two younger sisters. Oh, she’s nothing special, I have to treat her the same as her sisters and all (wink), except in my heart.

And that is where my dilemma used to lie, in my heart. I’ve heard tell that you love all your children the same, but I don’t believe that. I believe you love them the same amount, but I also believe you love them differently. For seven years she had been an only child, then we had to love another and then another. I certainly believe my love multiplied, but I also have learned different things about the love I have for each girl.

Cristina Joy brought strength to the family as I began a journey into motherhood, and with my husband, parenthood. Patricia Ann has brought growth to the family as I realized there is always more room for love. And lastly, Elise Adele has completed a family, and taught me it was a blessing to hold onto the early throws of motherhood one last time and be reminiscent of my many journeys.

I can embrace each one of them for what they’ve given me and their life is that much more meaningful to me than anything else in the world.”

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Thursday, May 15, 2008

Moving Mountains

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.


For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If you’d like to submit a daughter-mom photo to display on this blog, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is August 1, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

Today’s photo and post come to me from Beth Saxton. Thanks Beth!

“Today is my mom’s birthday. I guess birthdays are a time when you tend to reflect on a person and all they mean to you, so I'm feeling a little sentimental. My mom is that person that has been my personal cheerleader from the day I was born. Looking back I am so amazed at how much she poured into each of her three children. I know now that left little for herself and the unselfishness with which she raised us amazes me.

We grew up surrounded by a whirl of creativity, my mom is an artist by trade and it just oozes from everything she does. We had the privilege of listening to her play songs on the guitar that she made up just for us. She was the queen of make believe and encouraged us to exercise our imaginations. While other kids’ Halloween costumes most often appeared to have been bought from the local grocery store, ours were always some sort of dazzling concoction my mom whipped up on a budget! She made everything fun, even the ordinary things were extraordinary growing up with my mom.

I think I am at a stage in life, being a mom to my own little 2 year old, where everyday holds a profound realization of all my mom did for me. The things I can't even remember like the potty training, teaching me to brush my teeth, mind my manners, the little things. She did them all. I'm consumed by those little things everyday. I guess that is why suddenly I am so overwhelmingly grateful for all she did for me. I have always felt appreciative for my childhood, but it is deeper now. I also realize the effect just one great day can have on a person.

When I was in the third grade I started a new school. It was hard on me. There was a lot of changes in my life, and for some reason I have never dealt well with change. One of the things that was sending me to school with an ache in my stomach everyday was the fact that in order for my mom to make it to her new job on time we had to eat breakfast in the school cafeteria. I hated it. I don't remember complaining a lot, but I know I entered the doors every morning feeling like I was going to throw up. I think the shock of going from our normal routine of waffles or pancakes in our warm cozy kitchen to cereal on a Styrofoam tray in a rather sterile environment was sending me over the edge.

So, I'll never forget one morning when on our way to school my mom took a detour from our normal route. She whipped through our favorite donut shop and ordered a dozen. My brother, sister and I were cheering her on from the back seat. She pulled into one of our favorite parks and we all sat at a picnic table eating donuts in the early morning light. I remember the grass was really wet with dew and after we were done eating she let us play in the park until it was time to drop us off for school. I'm sure she was late to work that day. Maybe she even got in trouble. I know it was worth it. That day has stuck with me.

I think reflecting back it was just what I needed to feel like, in the midst of change and turmoil, my mom was still my mom. Even though she wasn't serving us sunshine on a plate in our kitchen every morning she still cared just as much as she always had. I think if I take anything away from what my mom taught me it will be that. Never be afraid to show anyone, but especially your children how much you care. They'll be people who can move mountains if they know you believe in them.”

Indeed they can!

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Wednesday, May 14, 2008

Mom, Teacher

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.


For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If you’d like to submit a daughter-mom photo to display on this blog, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is August 1, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

Today’s photo is of the sweet Johnson ladies, taken last year for my book “Thank You, Mom.”

This sweet tribute comes from Marissa Hulett:

“There is a woman in my life who taught me everything I know. She always told me “actions speak louder than words” and she has never been so right.

She showed me strength when my parents divorced and she somehow held it all together, at least in front of me. She showed me how to be kind with words by never speaking an ill word of my father, who she knew I loved and missed dearly. She showed me compassion when my best friend died in a car accident unexpectedly at such a young age. She showed me consideration when she asked me what I wanted to do when she met my step father and we decided to move. She showed me courage when my grandfather passed away and she had to take over the family business she knew very little about, just so she could make sure my grandmother, brother and I would always be taken care of. She showed me perseverance when she lost her job after selling the business by finding another job and doing whatever it took to stay afloat.

She showed me forgiveness by comforting me when I found out I was pregnant, before I was married. She showed me acceptance when I got married and she accepted my husband as one of her own. She showed me unconditional love when she held both of my sons after they were born. She showed me understanding when I told her my husband and I were going to move to another city for his job when she really did not want us to leave, but knew it was best for us. She shows me patience when I call her because I’m at my wits end with my children.

She shows me wisdom when I need to know what flower that was I just passed on the street because I want to include that in our landscaping project. She shows me faith when I tell her I feel worthless and she tells me she believes in me and I can do anything I set my mind to if I just follow my heart. She shows me how to love by loving all those around her without fail, even if she barely knows them or they are least deserving.

She has taught me so much in my life by being the person she is. She teaches me, even now, by the way she lives her life, not by what she tells me is right. She is remarkable, incredible, amazing, and truly unbelievable. She is my mother. She is the one from whom I learned everything I know.”

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Tuesday, May 13, 2008

Stormy Weather

It has been a hectic four days in my life. The storms that went through the south over the weekend made direct hits on my parents’ home as well as five other relatives. I’ve been running a chainsaw and dragging fallen limbs or cut tree trunks from here to there. My hands are so sore and swollen I can barely type. So please bear with me as I try to catch up here at home; I’ll be posting again soon.

Friday, May 09, 2008

Mother's Day

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.


For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If you’d like to submit a daughter-mom photo to display on this blog, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is August 1, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

In recognition of the coming Mother’s Day I thought I’d post some writings a number of daughters have shared with me…

Today’s photo is of Tiffany Harris and her mom, Debbie McIntire. She gave me permission to share a tribute she wrote on her own blog tmcharris.blogspot.com :

“No one could ask for a more lovely mother as mine. Her laugh is infectious, her eyes sparkle and dance, her smile is a smile you will remember for always with just one look. She's funny without trying; she's graceful and poised, and extremely charming. They need to make up a new word to describe the level of kindness she shows to others. She's strong when we need her to be, and meek at the same time. Her faith is limitless, or at least as far as I can see, and she is unwavering to her beliefs. I love you, Mom.”

And then there’s this poem written by Lydia Hernandez, for her daughter Amanda:

My every heart beat carries your name
I am and always will be forever yours.
Embrace my heart so close to yours
Keep it near your soul, it is yours to hold.
Hold my hand and guide me
Through the journey of life.
I promise I will never let go.
Hold my hand with you I will grow.
Hold my hand so very tight
I know no other love greater than life.
I will follow your steps and
Dance with you through life.
I could never fill your shoes
For you are larger than life.
I am and always will be forever yours.
You are truly a miracle.
Thank you for the gift of motherhood.

And Debra Nelson shared these thoughts:

“It (having her own children) made me realize, especially when Madi was in the terrible twos, that my mother was a saint, and I couldn’t believe she survived me! I really appreciated her so much more. You don’t realize it when you are a child, or a teenager, or even a young adult why your parents do the things they do...until you have children of your own. I actually called my mom one morning, when Madi was being such a stinker, and thanked her for not killing me when I was young...and she was wonderful and said all she remembered was I was "her girl" and it was all good. I really truly began to appreciate her like I never had before.”

Time changes everything, doesn’t it?

Finally, here is an excerpt from my book “Why a Son Needs Mom”:

“I do not know what my mother’s dreams were, what plans she had in mind for herself as she grew up, where she wanted to visit or what she might have become if she had chosen to live her life differently. I am ashamed that I do not know these things because I have never thought to ask, but I also do not know because my mother has never uttered a word of disappointment about the life she has lived. I do not know of her regrets for she does not share them, if they exist, nor does she lament about what her life used to be like or otherwise give off signs of disappointment about what age has taken from her. Perhaps she has just accepted her life for what it is, thinking it is too late to change it. Or, perhaps she is happy with her life for what it has been.

It is the latter, I like to think, because I know my mother has enjoyed being a mother, and a grandmother, and a surrogate mother or grandmother to those in need who have been fortunate enough to enter her life. I know this, because she never fails to seize the opportunity to act like a mom, to be there for someone.”

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Thursday, May 08, 2008

First Review


I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.


For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, http://www.gregoryelang.com/, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If you’d like to submit a daughter-mom photo to display on this blog, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is August 1, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

I found this review, one I rather like, and thought I’d post it for you:

“If you have a daughter, it’s hard not to get a little emotional reading this collection of anecdotes compiled by Gregory Lang (author of more pithy books like “Why a Daughter Needs a Dad: 100 Reasons”). This is not a deep book, but it does get at a lot important truths about the importance of a father to little (and big) girls. Sometimes, that’s also what dads need to give an extra push to their efforts. We all need to know that all those hours pushing swings and replacing toy batteries are the foundation of an enduring relationship that doesn’t end suddenly at adolescence. There has been plenty of research that shows this to be true, but Mr. Lang, in this compilation of his own and others’ stories, relates how this plays out in different ways. For the dad of a young girl, it also gives a not-always-comfortable look into the future when kids are grown up and dad is looking at what he’s leaving behind as a legacy, rather than what he is building in the here and now. It may have you weeping into your Scotch before the end of the second chapter.”

..from GreatDads.com

Today’s mother-daughter photo is of Mauri and her mom. Mauri writes:

“My mother has always been the strongest, most caring, and loving and opened armed woman I have ever known. She supported my sister and me in our decisions and guided us when she thought we were going astray. As I am married now and on my own, I have learned to appreciate every push, hug, kind word, lesson taught and angel gift that my mom has given me. She optimizes the love of a mother and if I’m ever half the woman that she is today, I will be happy. Not only are my sister and I her little angels, she is my guardian angel, now and forever.”


The second photo is one I took the other day in my fabulous studio (my garage). It is the Meagan Box I’ve written about so many times and is mentioned in Daddy’s Little Girl. Look closely and you’ll see a copy of Meagan’s birth certificate on the lid, complete with her tiny footprints, a photo of the first time I held her after being born, a photo of her first day at daycare, a photo of the day she got her acceptance letter to UGA (Go Dawgs!), her first pair of shoes (oh how I wish the ones she wore today were that cheap!), her first ballet slippers, selections of her artwork (can you see the $$$ signs she included on the “Dad” poster?), and finally, her favorite stuffed animal, Willard. How a kid came up with that name at age 2 I’ll never know.

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!


Wednesday, May 07, 2008

It was a good first day in the life of a book

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.


For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If you’d like to submit a daughter-mom photo to display on this blog, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is August 1, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

Meagan's Pre-K graduation day - perhaps my favorite photo of my Little Girl. Read about it in the final chapter of "Daddy's Little Girl."

The following is the script for the video we’re producing to advertise the book:

Hello readers, my name is Gregory E Lang. My friends call me Greg.

Ten years ago, my daughter Meagan was only eight years old, in the third grade and learning to write in cursive and do division.

Back then I helped her with her homework, brought home her first puppy and sometimes carried her around on my back from place to place.

One night, thinking about our relationship and wanting to make sure she understood just how much I loved her, I wrote a book about my thoughts.

That book, my first to be published, was called “Why a daughter Needs a Dad.”

Today Meagan is eighteen years old. Believe me, much has changed in ten years. I no longer help her with her homework and I certainly don’t carry her around on my back anymore.

In just three short months my daughter is leaving home to attend college. My little girl is now a young woman about to enter a new phase in her life. It is a phase where I will have but a small role to play.

Or will I?

I’ve written a new book for Meagan; it is called “Daddy’s Little Girl: Stories of the Special Bond Between Fathers and Daughters.” This book is a collection of stories about fathers and daughters of all ages and all walks of life. There are stories about love, hope, faith and forgiveness. Some stories are quite funny; others will bring tears to your eyes.

All the stories in Daddy’s Little Girl have one thing in common – evidence of the lasting bond between fathers and daughters.

I hope you will read “Daddy’s Little Girl.” As I’ve said, it will make you laugh, and it will make you cry.

It will also make you want to pick up the phone and call your daughter, or your dad. I promise.

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Tuesday, May 06, 2008

We have a launch...

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.


For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If you’d like to submit a daughter-mom photo to display on this blog, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is August 1, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

The Release day has finally arrived! Wow, it has been nearly two years since the conception of the idea for this book to today. I hope to have a photo up tomorrow of the girls and me at a bookstore standing before a stack of book; we’re taking it tonight. They don’t know of this plan yet but if I mention shoes somewhere in my request, they’ll indulge me. Anyway, the following is a press release about the book, posted for your review:

He is a husband and father not afraid to speak from his heart, a man who has shared his stories of marriage, parenting and the celebration of life with over 3 million readers.

Gregory E. Lang has written twenty books about the laughter and tears, challenges and joys, and heartwarming benefits of all our family relationships. His first book was written for his daughter and titled “Why a Daughter Needs a Dad.” Whether describing the days back when she kissed him in public, her first driving lesson or her current preparations for leaving home to attend college, Gregory Lang has documented his relationship with his only daughter, Meagan, and shared it with readers throughout North America, Europe and Asia.

Much of what he has written rings familiar with parents and children from around the world. Making his email address available in each of his books, he receives frequent correspondence from dads, daughters, mothers and sons telling him about their own relationships. Many ask for advice or simply offer thanks for reminding them of the importance of focusing on the family above all else.

In his most recent book, “Daddy’s Little Girl: Stories of the Special Bond Between Fathers and Daughters” (HarperOne), Lang returns to the subject that got him started as an author in the first place, his relationship with Meagan. He tells us in brief but poignant chapters of events in their father-daughter relationship that proved to be life lessons for both of them. Additionally, drawing from correspondence with the thousands of father and daughter fans who have contacted him over the years, he tells their stories, too.

“Daddy’s Little Girl” is a collection of stories about love, hope, faith in one another and forgiveness of mistakes both big and small. Some stories are quite funny; others will bring tears to your eyes. All are inspirational and have one thing in common – real life evidence of the lasting bond between fathers and daughters.

With “Daddy’s Little Girl,” Lang tells us more than ever about his relationship with Meagan, prepares himself for what has yet to come in their future, and reminds us all of the comfort, simple pleasures and vital importance of the father and daughter relationship.

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Monday, May 05, 2008

Together Again, At Last

I’m taking a bit of a detour from the usual Mom’s Little Angel post today. I’d like to honor my uncle, Michael Register, who died Saturday from complications of a broken heart. It was Uncle Mike and Aunt Mary Jean who inspired me to write “Why I Still Love You” fourteen months ago:

“A little more than a year ago my wife, Jill, and I sat back with members of my family in a crowded room and watched a man and a woman dance. He, agile and with deft feet, did most of the dancing. She, weakened by a long-term illness, smiled as he swirled around her. He held her hand to keep her steady and looked at her with love in his eyes, yet watching her closely for signs of fatigue. They were my aunt and uncle; it was their 50th wedding anniversary.

Uncle Mike and Aunt Mary Jean met in church at a youth fellowship event. They were each other’s first date; they had been each other’s only companion since that evening so long ago. Theirs was the longest romantic history of any couple I’ve ever known, except for my parents, who met over fifty-eight years ago.

As Jill and I watched my aunt and uncle dance, we were touched by the evidence of their enduring love, and yet somewhat saddened by a realization. We have been married only a few years; our union, a subsequent marriage for each of us, occurred when we were well into our midlife. We wish we had met sooner, fearing as we do that though we plan to spend the rest of our lives together, that time will be, indeed, too short. We will never see a 50th anniversary.

I tried to reassure my wife that evening by promising her I would make sure we packed as many wonderful experiences and romantic memories as we could into the time we would be given. I was confident in my promise because I have had good teachers to show me how to care for and nurture a lasting marriage.

In addition to my aunt and uncle and my parents, I have many other relatives who have also enjoyed long-lasting marriages. It is from my older relatives that I have learned spouses should always let their partner know he/she is irresistible, to never stop courting and flirting with one another, to reciprocate every gesture of affection and act of kindness shown to you, and always attempt to steal a kiss when it is least expected, no matter who may be watching. It was when watching my older married relatives interact that I have tried to discover the secrets of having a lasting marriage.

I think everyone has an older-generation couple in their family they look to as role models. We think of these people as role models because we see what we think are prefect or near-perfect marriages. We do not really know what their troubles might have been during their many years together, but we know that no matter what they were, the relationship endured the challenges they faced; the couple survived intact. Somehow they figured out what to do to overcome differences and stay focused on the love shared rather than the frustration or hurt that might have occurred. I wanted to know how to do that, too.

Perhaps, I think, one of the secrets of a lasting marriage is to understand that no matter how much you might love someone, your relationship will not be perfect. It will be tested, sometimes more than once. Love involves risk, hard work and compromises, even sometimes tears, but with the understanding that such difficulties will arise, they can be offset by the goodwill and good memories that have been intentionally created in advance.

An additional secret, and one which I hope will become common wisdom, is to also understand that to conquer the test is to reach a deeper, more enduring connection that helps the relationship to survive, if not thrive. More love is the reward for remaining persistent and diligent in protecting and preserving the relationship.

Uncle Mike and Aunt Mary Jean’s relationship thrived. I do not know of what difficulties they faced, but I am certain whatever they might have been, none were so great that any were remembered on the dance floor during that evening of celebration of their marriage. Nor were they a year later during one winter night when my aunt died at home.

That night her oldest son, another cousin and I, the first three grandchildren of our clan, stood at the foot of their bed and watched as my uncle held the body of his wife of fifty-one years. He stroked her hair, sang love songs to her, proclaimed her to be his best friend, and said to us, “I’m so glad she can finally rest.”

In the thirty minutes my cousins and I stood there bearing witness to this remarkable display of unselfish love, I learned what I now think is the real secret of lasting marriage. My uncle’s thoughts were not of the pain of his great loss, but of the absence of her pain, that which had gripped her for so long. In his heart, in his life, she came first.

And so it is. The secret to having a lasting marriage is that in all matters of life, the spouse comes first. It is the best, indeed the only, evidence which demonstrates, “You are more important to me than I am.” That is unselfish love. When both spouses abide by this moral, there is no fracture that could threaten the marriage, no obstacle that cannot be overcome, no limit to the love that can enjoyed.

I left the house that early morning carrying with me a new perspective on committing yourself to someone in marriage. When I next laid eyes on Jill, I saw her differently. I held her differently. I loved her differently – I loved her more, and I pledged then not to waste an opportunity to tell and show her, “I love you more than myself.”

I first set out to write this book to celebrate long-term, committed, romantic relationships, to create a gift for a couple who wanted to tell each other “I’m still so in love with you; I would marry you again tomorrow!” For them, I hope these pages resonate familiar and are shared together with a laugh and a smile.

I also wrote this book for couples who will weather storms, be it because of specific events or the personal and relationship changes that might occur during a lifetime. For them, I hope this book might be the perfect gift for one to communicate to the other that they want the relationship to endure. May these words and photos inspire them to embrace their romantic history and recommit to one another with hope and optimism.

Finally, I sat down to finish this book soon after having the privilege to witness the passing of my aunt. I conclude it now with a renewed promise to my wife: Jill, you come first in my life and in my heart. To give evidence of that promise, I will make sure that in the last day we spend together, you will know not only why I loved you in the beginning, but why I continued to love you till then.”

It came as no surprise to any of us that Uncle Mike’s last words were, “Mary Jean.”

We shall cry today when he is buried beside his beloved wife, but we shall then leave that place, return to their home and celebrate their reunion.

Friday, May 02, 2008

Who, who are you, who?

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.


For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If you’d like to submit a daughter-mom photo to display on this blog, please email it to greg.lang@mindspring.com.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is August 1, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

Today’s photo is of Jill’s friend, Amy and her daughters, both of who are very serious cheerleaders. Looks like Amy would like to be one, too. This photo appears in my book “Thank You, Mom.”

Please, please, please put your name on your stories if your email address does not include your name. It would be a shame if I only knew you by a few letters and numbers or a funky screen name. Thanks!

This came in from someone I know only as jd:

“Writing a story about a mother and daughter’s bond isn’t as easy as it looks. Mothers and daughters share so many wonderful memories and fun times throughout their years together. There are also many ups and downs that happen between a mother and a daughter. There are many laughs, tears and smiles. When I first found out I was pregnant with my daughter, I can remember my Mom saying ‘You are going to be a great Mom!’ I asked her how she knew that, how could she be so certain. She said that it was something that she just knew. She stressed that everything would come naturally and it’s something that I would truly love doing. I didn’t know how she could be so certain about something that she’d never witnessed before – me being a Mom.

Here it is almost seven years later and I have to admit that my Mom was right again! As soon as my little girl was born, the instincts kicked in and I was in love with being a Mom as well as with my little girl. My days were filled with tender touches, sweet breaths, cuddles, and lots of staring in complete amazement. I think my Mom knew that because she was such a great Mom, I in turn would be a great Mom also. All the things my Mom instilled in me, all the battles we had, all the talks, all the things she taught me, all the hugs and kisses, had been passed on to me so that I could become a great Mom, too.

There are times when I’ll be talking to my daughter and realize I sound just like my Mom, and I’m fine with that. She’s such a great Mom and I hope one day my daughter will say that about me.”


A note to readers: I realize this may be a subtle distinction, but please bear with me a moment. I am searching for immediate, in the moment tales of the mother and daughter bond rather than a high-level view that summaries and praises. I'm more than happy to work with you to get it to a specific, obvious "moral of the story" kind of tale. Please take a look at my blog on the April 23rd post, Three Generations. It gives two examples of what I want to include in Mom’s Little Angel. Remember, if you are struggling to find the heart of your story, ask me to call you. We can work together on the phone and I’ll record the conversation, saving you from having to write a story.

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!