Wednesday, June 25, 2008

Home Cooking

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about mother-daughter relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which daughters and moms might derive hope and guidance after reading them.

What did you learn from this unique parent-child relationship, how it has changed over the years, how you two dealt with conflict, etc? The stories can be about good or bad times, as long as the result is something others can learn from. There are no format or length requirements.

For more information about submitting your story, please visit my website, www.gregoryelang.com, and click the red corner on the home page, just beneath the “Projects” tab.

I’m also conducting recorded telephone interviews for those who prefer to tell rather than write their story. Just send me an email with your phone number and dates/times you are available. Interviews typically last 30-45 minutes.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

The deadline for submitting your story or participating in an interview is July 15, 2008.

Now on to today’s post~

While in NYC I was video taped doing an interview for Daddy’s Little Girl. That video will eventually become three small clips to be posted on the web promoting the book. Here are a few questions from the interview:

What's it like to photograph real life dads and daughters? How do you get the best photographs?

I prefer everyday people to pro models, readers respond better to people they can relate to, helps them to see themselves in my photographs. I get to know families in their own space, work by referral to friends and family, do things the kids enjoy and try to have a good time. Sometimes I take 200 shots to get the perfect one.

Why do you enjoy telling other people's stories?

I’m a story-teller at heart, and I believe personal experiences are better than fictional parables when trying to deliver a life-lesson. We learn from one another in every step of our lives; most everyone wants to be an inspiration to others.

What is one thing dad's underestimate about their importance in their daughter's lives?

His impact on her self-esteem. Daughters select husbands in response to her feelings about her relationship with her dad. She’ll either want someone just like him, or nothing like him. Either decision is a direct result on what the father lead the daughter to believe about herself.


In writing Mom's Little Angel, what did you learn about the mom/daughter relationship that you didn't know before?

There really are differences in the relationship between daughter-mom vs. daughter-dad. Dads are heroes who have big epic moments, but moms are more often in the background being ready, steady and consistent, creating innumerable little moments that maybe no one but the child sees.

How is it different writing about dads and daughters vs. mom's and daughters since that's not a relationship that you are a part of?

I had either been through or could anticipate many of the events other dads and daughter shared with me when describing their relationships, so it was easy to weave their stories with my own stories about my girls. Without that personal experience as a daughter or mom, I was an observer rather than a participant while collecting stories. It took more effort to get inside the story to find its heart, but I eventually got there with the help of my wife.

What is the most important time or moment in a mother and daughter's relationship?

There isn’t one, rather the constancy of “being there” is the key. Dads have big, defining moments; moms on the other hand are always holding everything together. Moms really are the glue in the household.

What does your book offer mother's and daughters?

Applause and affirmation. I make a clear statement at the end of the book that dads can’t enjoy the full potential of the father-daughter relationship without the positive influence of the mother-daughter relationship. It really is a golden rule phenomenon: if each parent encourages the other parent-child relationship, both parent’s own parent-child relationship will thrive also as a result.

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

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