Thursday, July 31, 2008

Celebrate

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about family relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which children and parents might derive hope, guidance and a smile after reading them.

I am conducting recorded telephone interviews to gather the information necessary to portray your story. Interviews last 30-45 minutes; just send me an email (See “Links” below for my address) requesting an interview appointment.

For those who prefer to write their story rather than participate in an interview, you must submit it via my website. Please visit www.gregoryelang.com and click the red corner on the home page just beneath the “Projects” tab.

Stories are not published as submitted or told but rather are used as anecdotes told by me, the narrator, to help illustrate a message about teaching or cherished moments between mothers and daughters.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

Stories about the fun moms and daughters have together, how moms teach daughters what it means to be a woman (putting on makeup, first period, first bra, first boyfriend), help with the challenges of a wedding and marriage, daughters helping mom in a technological world, etc., are all welcome.

NOTE: The deadline to offer a mother-daughter story is tomorrow.

Now on to today’s post~

A Reason for Celebration

While searching through recipes on the Internet trying to find the perfect recipe for preparing a juicy New York Strip and the traditional accompaniments for her husband’s birthday dinner, Phoebe remembered he asked that nothing special be done on his behalf – it was just another birthday.

She couldn’t hold back her devilish grin. That a birthday might pass without grand celebration was beyond her comprehension. Her mother was responsible for such thinking.

In fact, in her thirty years of living, Phoebe couldn’t remember her mom not making a big deal out of “special occasions”. All occasions were special to mom. Dad had literally nicknamed his wife “Mrs. Holiday,” most likely because she often invented holidays if she thought too much time had passed since the last official reason for celebration. There was the Last Day of Summer, First Day of Spring, the 183rd Day of the Year, and more.

Continuing to this day Phoebe’s mom makes sure her family members’ birthdays are as big and celebratory as Christmas mornings are. Independence Day, Memorial Day, Pioneer Day and Halloween celebrations each last two days in Mrs. Holiday’s household. Each year while living at home, Phoebe walked into a bedroom loaded with Valentine cards after coming home from school. Easter called for new outfits and a basket loaded with chocolate eggs and bunnies, and then there was Christmas. Santa Claus still visits Mrs. Holiday’s house and leaves gifts for the grown children and, of course, grandchildren.

Phoebe remembered talking with an aunt recently who shared with her a story. The aunt said she had run into her sister wandering around a department store and asked what she was looking for. Mrs. Holiday said she didn’t have anything particular in mind but she needed an end of the school year gift for Phoebe.

“Phoebe’s a little old for that, isn’t she,” the aunt remarked.

“It’s what I’ve always done,” Mrs. Holiday replied. “Besides, Phoebe’s a teacher so technically it is still the end of the school year for her.”

Phoebe smiled hearing the story, knowing with certainty her mother would buy end of the school year gifts for her grandchildren, too, once they entered elementary school, if she could wait that long.

Tempted most by the Steak au Poivre with Morel Mushrooms, Phoebe printed the recipe, knowing also that she had fallen victim to her mother’s influence. In her home there would be gifts when least expected, a special dinner for every birthday that passed, and the celebration of holidays no one had ever heard of, all in the tradition of her mother, the woman who had taught her how to celebrate what mattered most – life.

Do you have a heartwarming mother-daughter story to tell? A glimpse into an important teaching moment between you and mom or daughter? A confirmation of love? Just a wonderful moment you’ll never forget? If yes, please let me know!

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Wednesday, July 30, 2008

A Mother's Legacy

I write heartfelt and inspirational stories about family relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which children and parents might derive hope, guidance and a smile after reading them.

I collect written stories and conduct recorded telephone interviews to gather the information necessary to put together a story for my book projects. Stories are not published as submitted or told but rather are used as anecdotes told by me, the narrator, to help illustrate a message about teaching or cherished moments.

Please visit www.gregoryelang.com and click the red corner on the home page just beneath the “Projects” tab to learn more about what projects I may be working on.

NOTE: The deadline to offer a mother-daughter story is in just two days. Please continue to visit this blog for updates on the book as it begins the last leg of its journey toward publication (Spring, 2009).

Now on to today’s post~

"Have you gotten down on your knees?" was nearly always the question that came in answer to most of Emily’s appeals to her mother for help or advice. From an early age Emily knew that was just what her mother would say; in her opinion there was simply nothing too small to pray about.

Emily’s mother had taught her to pray at a very young age, never tucking her into bed without reminding her to say her prayers. Brush your teeth, put on your pajamas, pray and then go to sleep were her nightly marching orders. In this setting Emily came to believe God does hear and answer prayers, and like her mother, nothing was too big or small to talk with God about.

Yet, Emily was at times a difficult child who often tested the limits of her parents’ patience. Her mother often said she hoped Emily would one day have a child just like her. Well, as fate would have it, she did. Today, Emily’s two year old daughter Mackenzie has a personality just like her mom did when a child and young teen. She presses every button she knows about and questions every request or directive her mother gives her.

One particular morning during a time when Emily’s husband was out of town on a business trip, she was running on fumes, having gotten too little sleep and with so many things to do. She was too exhausted to argue with Mackenzie about wearing the old handed down bright pink dance costume adorned with frayed roses and sequins, more than a few missing. How did my mom do it? she asked herself as she gathered her children into the van. She had made mothering look so easy, she remembered. After all, the house was always spotless, dinner was both nutritious and ready on time, there were clean clothes for all to wear, and she always knew just how to make the aches and pains of her children disappear.

It was because of her mother that Emily had dreamed for years of having a family of her own. But, she feared she would never measure up to the example her mother had set. She doubted she could ever accomplish so much.

The last errand of the day was an appointment to get each child a much needed haircut. Struggling to keep her children together Emily herded them across the parking lot and together they nearly tumbled though the door of the salon. The children, just as tired as mom, were loud and whiny and debated about who touched who first on the way in. Mackenzie spotted a basket of suckers on the counter and immediately demanded one. A pink one to match her dress, no less.

After much wailing and jumping about Emily reached her limit with her little girl’s tantrum. “I am going to put you in time out in the car!” she threatened, to which Mackenzie abruptly stopped crying and squirming and sat down in a chair to await her turn for a haircut.

Emily then moved to check on her other children who were already having their long locks trimmed. Before leaving Mackenzie she reminded her to be quiet and added, “fold your hands in your lap.” The little girl grinned wide and promptly folded her hands together.

Moments later Emily glanced over at Mackenzie. She was not only sitting quietly in the chair with her hands folded together but her head was bowed and she appeared to be saying a prayer. This was confirmed when she gave a snappy nod of her head and announced, “AMEN!”

Maybe she was praying for a new mommy or a pink sucker, Emily thought, but neither case mattered much. What mattered was that her sweet little girl with the ratty hair and wearing the needed-to-be-thrown-away dress was praying. And was doing so by her own choice.

At that moment Emily realized she was indeed much like her mother. Dinner may not always be nutritious or on the table at six o’clock sharp and the house may not always be spotless, but her children know that God hears and answers their prayers.

At that moment Emily knew that at least in her mother’s eyes, she did measure up after all.

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Tuesday, July 29, 2008

Special Love

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about family relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which children and parents might derive hope, guidance and a smile after reading them.

I am conducting recorded telephone interviews to gather the information necessary to portray your story. Interviews last 30-45 minutes; just send me an email (See “Links” below for my address) requesting an interview appointment.

For those who prefer to write their story rather than participate in an interview, you must submit it via my website. Please visit www.gregoryelang.com and click the red corner on the home page just beneath the “Projects” tab.

Stories are not published as submitted or told but rather are used as anecdotes told by me, the narrator, to help illustrate a message about teaching or cherished moments between mothers and daughters.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

Stories about the fun moms and daughters have together, how moms teach daughters what it means to be a woman (putting on makeup, first period, first bra, first boyfriend), help with the challenges of a wedding and marriage, daughters helping mom in a technological world, etc., are all welcome.

NOTE: The deadline to offer a mother-daughter story has been reset to the original deadline of August 1st.

Now on to today’s post~

I’m on vacation, Martha thought, wondering why in the world she was up just past six o’clock in the morning. But there she was scampering down the sidewalk, her nearly five year old daughter pulling hard, leading her forward by the hand.

“We’re almost there Mommy,” Ashley said with excitement, pulling her mom along a little faster now. “We’re almost to Special Love.”

Martha held her daughter’s hand tight and kept her other one on the new baby growing inside her, trying to make sure she didn’t bounce the next daughter around too much. They were making their way to the neighborhood coffee shop Ashley had spotted a few days before. Yes, it was early and she was on a well deserved vacation, but there were only a few mornings left for her first child to be an only child and the sole recipient of all mom’s attention and affection.

Both knew their one-on-one years were coming to an end; they had discussed it just last night before bath time, when Ashley tried to hear her little sister’s heartbeat before using finger paints to decorate mommy’s full belly. Not to mention all those times Ashley saw her mom working in the new nursery or stealing moments from rest to write another chapter in her book. Both understood change was near.

That was why during the evening before when eating lobster and steamed corn on the cob at the fisherman’s pier Martha hadn’t fussed about the butter and juices of the sea running down her child’s cheeks and arms, and why they had stayed on the pier until sundown watching fishing boats come in and thinking of names for the starfish they had spied sleeping on a buoy. That was why she had crawled out of bed so early on the last day of her vacation to run to a coffee shop, on a morning when instinct told her to sleep late while she could, before the baby came.

The morning sun rose above the trees to greet the pair and while daughter kept pulling with thoughts only of pastries and chocolate milk mom admired the quaint little clapboard houses with burgeoning window boxes and white picket fences and wondered how much longer her first child would hold hands with her in public. Ashley was growing up so fast. Be in the moment, she reminded herself, enjoy the simple pleasure of this moment.

“We’re here, Mommy, we’re at Special Love,” Ashley announced with great enthusiasm.

Looking up at the sign over the door and seeing it read “Espresso Love,” Martha smiled and didn’t dare correct her daughter’s mistake; it was one other simple indulgence she could afford her. After all, in that moment, there was indeed Special Love.

Do you have a heartwarming mother-daughter story to tell? A glimpse into an important teaching moment between you and mom or daughter? A confirmation of love? Just a wonderful moment you’ll never forget? If yes, please let me know!

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Monday, July 28, 2008

When No is the best answer

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about family relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which children and parents might derive hope, guidance and a smile after reading them.

I am conducting recorded telephone interviews to gather the information necessary to portray your story. Interviews last 30-45 minutes; just send me an email (See “Links” below for my address) requesting an interview appointment.

For those who prefer to write their story rather than participate in an interview, you must submit it via my website. Please visit www.gregoryelang.com and click the red corner on the home page just beneath the “Projects” tab.

Stories are not published as submitted or told but rather are used as anecdotes told by me, the narrator, to help illustrate a message about teaching or cherished moments between mothers and daughters.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

Stories about the fun moms and daughters have together, how moms teach daughters what it means to be a woman (putting on makeup, first period, first bra, first boyfriend), help with the challenges of a wedding and marriage, daughters helping mom in a technological world, etc., are all welcome.

NOTE: The deadline to offer a mother-daughter story has been reset to the original deadline of August 1st.

Now on to today’s post~

Amanda sat in the car alongside her mom, frustrated and angry that her overbearing, controlling mother would not let her spend the night with a girlfriend just because she didn’t approve of her friend’s conduct.

“Why are you so mean?” Amanda finally asked, rather, accused, her mom. Isabel turned to her daughter, her only child, in shock and speechless. Her lips quivered and a tear trickled from the corner of her eye.

“Amanda” she said, “I can tell you I have never been a mom before, but I’ve been who you are. I’ve been a daughter wanting to go places and do things, not caring what my mother thought. Honestly, I don’t know if I am doing the right thing by saying ‘No,’” she paused and wiped the tear from her cheek, “but I do know I don’t want anything to happen to you.”

In that moment the daughter came to realize the mother wasn’t an ogre after all, but simply a well meaning woman trying her best to be a good mom.

Amanda didn’t go anywhere that evening, and to this day she thinks of that enlightening moment in the car when she deals with her own children, hoping that they too will realize one day why sometimes she too must say “No.”

Do you have a heartwarming mother-daughter story to tell? A glimpse into an important teaching moment between you and mom or daughter? A confirmation of love? Just a wonderful moment you’ll never forget? If yes, please let me know!

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Friday, July 25, 2008

Wishing Well

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about family relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which children and parents might derive hope, guidance and a smile after reading them.

I am conducting recorded telephone interviews to gather the information necessary to portray your story. Interviews last 30-45 minutes; just send me an email (See “Links” below for my address) requesting an interview appointment.

For those who prefer to write their story rather than participate in an interview, you must submit it via my website. Please visit www.gregoryelang.com and click the red corner on the home page just beneath the “Projects” tab.

Stories are not published as submitted or told but rather are used as anecdotes told by me, the narrator, to help illustrate a message about teaching or cherished moments between mothers and daughters.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

Stories about the fun moms and daughters have together, how moms teach daughters what it means to be a woman (putting on makeup, first period, first bra, first boyfriend), help with the challenges of a wedding and marriage, daughters helping mom in a technological world, etc., are all welcome.

NOTE: The deadline to offer a mother-daughter story has been reset to the original deadline of August 1st.

Now on to today’s post~

I received this email from a dad who told me a story for Daddy’s Little Girl:

“I wanted to tell you how much I enjoyed your book. I sent a copy to my daughter without her knowing that our contribution was included and she was overcome that you printed our little vignette.

I would like to share with you the Father's Day card that Susie sent to me. The front is a photo of four legs, two male and two smaller ones, dangling off the end of a pier over water. It says

'When I was little, getting to hang out with my dad was on of the best things in the whole world.'

The inside says: 'Still is.'

Life is good.

Men (and women too), who fail to establish that relationship with their children do not realize how important it is later in life. What else are we here for?”

I can’t agree with you more, sir.

And then there is this mom-daughter story based on one morning a mother described to me:

“It was dawn when Rene awakened and sat up in bed. She was in a great morning mood, not at all crabby as if she were rolling out of the wrong side of the bed. She was beyond that now.

Little Tessa lay curled up beside mom, her young skin resting against Rene’s. The little girl’s morning breath whispered in and out in the quite room as she panted during her innocent dreams. Mom leaned down to the cherub face and inhaled the odor that to her was nothing less than sweet. With gentle fingers she swept the wild curly hair behind her daughter’s ears.

A new day was beginning and everything was just as it should have been. Just the way her daughter needed it to be. Rene quietly got out of bed and went about her morning routine.

The best part of the morning for Rene was that it proceeded with clarity. Nothing was fuzzy or foggy or forgotten from the night before. She smiled, recalling how they had played Candy Land and then sang together while sharing a bubble bath. And again today Tessa would get a warm breakfast and be at the school bus stop on time.

There were no more mornings of late arrivals or skipping school altogether. There were no more mornings when Rene would stumble out of bed and be angry as she poured a cup of coffee and swore one more time to stop drinking. Cancelled play dates, skipped music lessons and forgotten ballet classes were a thing of the past.

For this clarity, for the new stability, peace and happiness in her life, Rene had Tessa to thank. It was the sweet, innocent little girl’s softly spoken wish while throwing a penny in a fountain that had changed everything.”

Do you have a heartwarming mother-daughter story to tell? A glimpse into an important teaching moment between you and mom or daughter? A confirmation of love? Just a wonderful moment you’ll never forget? If yes, please let me know!

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Thursday, July 24, 2008

A Mother's Strength

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about family relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which children and parents might derive hope, guidance and a smile after reading them.

I am conducting recorded telephone interviews to gather the information necessary to portray your story. Interviews last 30-45 minutes; just send me an email (See “Links” below for my address) requesting an interview appointment.

For those who prefer to write their story rather than participate in an interview, you must submit it via my website. Please visit www.gregoryelang.com and click the red corner on the home page just beneath the “Projects” tab.

Stories are not published as submitted or told but rather are used as anecdotes told by me, the narrator, to help illustrate a message about teaching or cherished moments between mothers and daughters.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

Stories about the fun moms and daughters have together, how moms teach daughters what it means to be a woman (putting on makeup, first period, first bra, first boyfriend), help with the challenges of a wedding and marriage, daughters helping mom in a technological world, etc., are all welcome.

NOTE: The deadline to offer a mother-daughter story has been reset to the original deadline of August 1st.

Now on to today’s post~

One daughter’s loving mother story:

“As a teen, I was a wildfire. My mom was my mortal enemy because I wanted to live my life the way I wanted to without any regard for what I was doing or who I was hurting. One could say our relationship one was explosive.

As I grew in years but not maturity, mom's words rang through my head every time I knew I was doing something wrong and I would always go running back to her when I would inevitably fall into the pile of poo. She would always pick me up, wash me off, give me an ear full and then I would be on my way again.

I finally realized my mother was the only person in this world who really loved me, good, bad or indifferent, and she always let me know it, when I had my first stroke at the age of 31. She herself was sick herself but got out bed and took care of me. My mom was the one who took me to the doctors, therapy and wherever else I had to go to. She would yell at me to motivate me when I was ready to give up. She never gave up on me.

Now, several more strokes later, I am walking and suffer only a few set backs and my mom is in need of my help. She has had several heart attacks and they have told us the next one will require open heart surgery. She may not pull through it because of how bad her heart is.

I cannot even start to imagine my life without her; I am terrified. She is my best friend and I am lost without her for even one moment. She is the strongest woman I know, a woman whose story should be heard.”

And now, it is.

Do you have a heartwarming mother-daughter story to tell? A glimpse into an important teaching moment between you and mom or daughter? A confirmation of love? Just a wonderful moment you’ll never forget? If yes, please let me know!

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Wednesday, July 23, 2008

Amazing Mom

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about family relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which children and parents might derive hope, guidance and a smile after reading them.

I am conducting recorded telephone interviews to gather the information necessary to portray your story. Interviews last 30-45 minutes; just send me an email (See “Links” below for my address) requesting an interview appointment.

For those who prefer to write their story rather than participate in an interview, you must submit it via my website. Please visit www.gregoryelang.com and click the red corner on the home page just beneath the “Projects” tab.

Stories are not published as submitted or told but rather are used as anecdotes told by me, the narrator, to help illustrate a message about teaching or cherished moments between mothers and daughters.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

Stories about the fun moms and daughters have together, how moms teach daughters what it means to be a woman (putting on makeup, first period, first bra, first boyfriend), help with the challenges of a wedding and marriage, daughters helping mom in a technological world, etc., are all welcome.

NOTE: The deadline to offer a mother-daughter story has been reset to the original deadline of August 1st.

Now on to today’s post~

I want to share this touching tribute that came to me from Rhea Thomas:

“My mother is the one woman I look up to most in this world. It's true. She's a huge role model to me, and if I could turn out to be half the woman she is I would be so happy.

She's taught me much throughout my life; she has helped mold me into the person I am today, and shown me the person I want to continue to work to BE. When I was little, growing up on our ranch, she took us (me, my little sister and our four older half-siblings) on hikes into the woods. She taught us the names of every tree, flower and bush, and even showed us the edible ones. I wish I'd listened closer.

She encouraged creativity, doing crafts with us at home, making God's Eyes and collages. I wish I had her artistic ability. It inspired me to try to do crafts with my kids, and they love my attempts.

She kept a steady supply of books on our bookshelves and boosted my love of reading. She read to us and encouraged knowledge and learning. She went back to school and finished two undergraduate degrees and a law degree with children at home.

We learned to be mischievous from her, from all the little pranks she pulled around the house, from the Styrofoam head in the toilets to the "I'm not your mother, an alien has taken over my body" events. When she toilet-papered her friend's house we went along and learned the art of papering.

She gave me my first camera and passed on her love of photography. She taught me to preserve my family's memories through pictures and to put them albums right away, so we could enjoy and relive our happy times through them.

She shared her love of animals with me. My life is not complete with an animal in my life. We had cats, dogs, cattle, pigs, chickens, donkeys, ducks, horses, peacocks and rabbits on our ranch. We always had pets growing up and she even talked me into getting a pot belly pig in high school when I wanted a puppy. Cory the pig became the best pet I've ever had.

She taught me I should reach for the stars and could do anything I put my mind to. I know potential is inside me because she put it there. She taught me it's never too late to do something with my life.

Best of all, she is now teaching MY children these things, and for that, I am thrilled beyond belief. They will benefit from knowing her and her knowledge, just like I did, and I could honestly not ask for more from her.

I love my mom. She's my best friend, my mentor, my confidant, my idol, and one of the most amazing people I know. I truly treasure her and the relationship we have. Thanks, Mom, for all you do and all that you are.”

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Tuesday, July 22, 2008

Dancing in the Rain

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about family relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which children and parents might derive hope, guidance and a smile after reading them.

I am conducting recorded telephone interviews to gather the information necessary to portray your story. Interviews last 30-45 minutes; just send me an email (See “Links” below for my address) requesting an interview appointment.

For those who prefer to write their story rather than participate in an interview, you must submit it via my website. Please visit www.gregoryelang.com and click the red corner on the home page just beneath the “Projects” tab.

Stories are not published as submitted or told but rather are used as anecdotes told by me, the narrator, to help illustrate a message about teaching or cherished moments between mothers and daughters.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

Stories about the fun moms and daughters have together, how moms teach daughters what it means to be a woman (putting on makeup, first period, first bra, first boyfriend), help with the challenges of a wedding and marriage, daughters helping mom in a technological world, etc., are all welcome.

NOTE: The deadline to offer a mother-daughter story has been reset to the original deadline of August 1st.

Now on to today’s post~

I want to share this wonderfull tribute story that was sent in the other day:

“My mother had one son and two more daughters after Mary was born. I was the youngest of 5. We grew up on acreage with huge gardens, a milk cow named Bessie, and a father who out of need, worked away from home for most of our youth. My mother had no driver’s license, no car to take her from here to there. But going somewhere was not a big concern, mom had work to do, and do it she did. The teary part for me is that when I look back at the immense amount of hard work I realize my mother did, add on a brood of 5, which included a special needs child in diapers, no husband around most of the time, never ever did I hear her mutter of word of bitterness, or self pity. Never!

Our room for preserves was plump full in fall, a feast of canned fruits beyond any I have seen yet. Her garden’s gifts found their way onto our plates in the cold months, and the potatoes filled up our tummies every day. Homemade bread, cinnamon rolls waiting when we got home from school, all the while taking care of my sister. For 30 years my mother fed Mary, bathed her, changed her diapers, and never ever uttered a word of complaint. We were not raised in a home where “I love you” was spoken, but there was no doubt ever in our little hearts that this woman didn’t love every fiber of us. Deep down inside, we had the wonderful knowledge of knowing that if it was any of us rather than Mary, she would be there giving selflessly and in turn giving so much dignity with her quiet humility.

The passage of time since they have both left our family has firmly implanted this awe of sorts of what my mother gave us by her example. Her compassion and empathy was incredible, her patience and endurance came with softness and gentle love. She showed us how to mother with great love, and how to let laughter in when a chuckle was needed.

She showed all of us how to care, one of her favorite saying was “you never judge, you just don’t know what they have gone through.” I only heard her swear once, and that was because she didn’t know what the word meant. She would sit at the table when all her children were home and hardly say a word, but you could see this smile on her face.

As a mother myself, I finally understand why she did that. There is such beauty in just listening to your children talk. She would let us go out and dance in the rain, get totally soaked from head to foot, understanding there was a total sense of joy and freedom in dancing in the rain.”

Do you have a heartwarming mother-daughter story to tell? A glimpse into an important teaching moment between you and mom or daughter? A confirmation of love? Just a wonderful moment you’ll never forget? If yes, please let me know!

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Monday, July 21, 2008

Good morning!

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about family relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which children and parents might derive hope, guidance and a smile after reading them.

I am conducting recorded telephone interviews to gather the information necessary to portray your story. Interviews last 30-45 minutes; just send me an email (See “Links” below for my address) requesting an interview appointment.

For those who prefer to write their story rather than participate in an interview, you must submit it via my website. Please visit www.gregoryelang.com and click the red corner on the home page just beneath the “Projects” tab.

Stories are not published as submitted or told but rather are used as anecdotes told by me, the narrator, to help illustrate a message about teaching or cherished moments between mothers and daughters.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

Stories about the fun moms and daughters have together, how moms teach daughters what it means to be a woman (putting on makeup, first period, first bra, first boyfriend), help with the challenges of a wedding and marriage, daughters helping mom in a technological world, etc., are all welcome.

NOTE: The deadline to offer a mother-daughter story has been reset to the original deadline of August 1st.

Now on to today’s post~

Today I want to share this little piece I wrote for GreatDad.com:

A daughter needs a father to protect her from thunder and lightening.

When I wrote that statement for my first book, “Why a Daughter Needs a Dad,” I quite literally meant it. My daughter was only eight years old at the time and still came to my side or crawled into my bed whenever a severe storm loomed over our home. It was my job back then to provide comfort and give reassurance that I would always take care of her.

Over the years my daughter’s fear of thunder and lightening has faded, but not her need for my comfort and reassurance. She still comes to me when tears fill her eyes or when doubt enters her mind. I still embrace my role as her protector.

But while many of her fears have faded during the last ten years, my worst - the fear some harm may come to my child - has not. I once was afraid she might burn herself while learning to cook and later, have an accident while behind the wheel of her own car. Now I fear what unknown harm may come to her after she leaves home to attend college.

You see, she will be miles away then, unable to call out for me or rush to my side. I will not be near enough to see that look on her face that tells me she needs me even though she has not yet said a word.

In the last few weeks we have together before she leaves, I do the only thing I can think of to calm my fears – talk with her every day, inquiring if she remembers how to handle this or that situation, what to do if, and more.

She always has the right answers, thank God, and she doesn’t protest my relentless hypothetical scenarios. She understands, and appreciates, that I’m only doing what a dad does. Protect his own. Protect her.

I hope you’ll visit GretDad.com once in a while; they’re good people.

Do you have a heartwarming mother-daughter story to tell? A glimpse into an important teaching moment between you and mom or daughter? A confirmation of love? Just a wonderful moment you’ll never forget? If yes, please let me know!

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Friday, July 18, 2008

Pennies to Dollars (cont.)

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about family relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which children and parents might derive hope, guidance and a smile after reading them.

I am conducting recorded telephone interviews to gather the information necessary to portray your story. Interviews last 30-45 minutes; just send me an email (See “Links” below for my address) requesting an interview appointment.

For those who prefer to write their story rather than participate in an interview, you must submit it via my website. Please visit www.gregoryelang.com and click the red corner on the home page just beneath the “Projects” tab.

Stories are not published as submitted or told but rather are used as anecdotes told by me, the narrator, to help illustrate a message about teaching or cherished moments between mothers and daughters.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

Stories about the fun moms and daughters have together, how moms teach daughters what it means to be a woman (putting on makeup, first period, first bra, first boyfriend), help with the challenges of a wedding and marriage, daughters helping mom in a technological world, etc., are all welcome.

NOTE: The deadline to offer a mother-daughter story has been reset to the original deadline of August 1st.

Now on to today’s post~

Pennies to Dollars (Part Two)

“Deanne was bursting with excitement during the ride to the mall. Arriving, Francis parked in such a way they had to pass through a large department store before getting to the store that was their desired destination. Coincidentally, their route required them to pass through the girls department where Deanne couldn’t help but notice all the cute outfits on the racks. She stopped to try some of them on and found that she loved everything she put her hands on.

Soon Francis put the clothing back on the racks and told Deanne it was time to make their way to the other store to buy the jeans. While leaving the department store and walking into the mall Deanne couldn’t stop thinking about all the clothes she had just tried on.

They found the jeans in the right size and Deanne ran into a dressing room. As she stood in the mirror looking at herself in the very jeans she had worked so hard for, she realized she would be able to buy ALL of those other clothes for what she was about to spend on the one pair of jeans she was wearing at that moment.

She and her mother left the mall that day with several bags of pretty new outfits in tow.

Deanne remembered that day standing in the mirror wearing those expensive designer jeans as she urged her own young daughter to drop the change she had earned keeping her room clean into the pink piggy bank that sat on her dresser. ‘Why can’t I keep it?’ Hannah asked, unwilling to let go.

‘Because you always pay your bills first, put some in savings second, and only then is the rest of the money yours to spend as you wish,’ Deanna said.

Deanna never regretted not buying that pair of jeans that day. She smiled when she heard Hannah’s coins jingled in the bottom of the piggy bank, knowing that one day she too would teach her children the value of a dollar.”

Do you have a heartwarming mother-daughter story to tell? A glimpse into an important teaching moment between you and mom or daughter? A confirmation of love? Just a wonderful moment you’ll never forget? If yes, please let me know!

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Thursday, July 17, 2008

Pennies to Dollars

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about family relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which children and parents might derive hope, guidance and a smile after reading them.

I am conducting recorded telephone interviews to gather the information necessary to portray your story. Interviews last 30-45 minutes; just send me an email (See “Links” below for my address) requesting an interview appointment.

For those who prefer to write their story rather than participate in an interview, you must submit it via my website. Please visit www.gregoryelang.com and click the red corner on the home page just beneath the “Projects” tab.

Stories are not published as submitted or told but rather are used as anecdotes told by me, the narrator, to help illustrate a message about teaching or cherished moments between mothers and daughters.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

Stories about the fun moms and daughters have together, how moms teach daughters what it means to be a woman (putting on makeup, first period, first bra, first boyfriend), help with the challenges of a wedding and marriage, daughters helping mom in a technological world, etc., are all welcome.

NOTE: The deadline to offer a mother-daughter story has been reset to the original deadline of August 1st.

Now on to today’s post~

Click here to read a review of Daddy’s Little Girl:
http://feministreview.blogspot.com/2008/07/daddys-little-girl-stories-of-special.html

Today’s photograph appears in the Spanish translation of my book Why a Daughter Needs a Mom.

A life lesson story for you (Part 1):

“Francis raised her daughters Deanne and Karen alone after a divorce. She knew there would be hard times ahead making do with one paycheck, but she was determined not to let anything compromise the time and opportunities she wanted to give to her daughters. In spite of the long hours she worked, Francis still made oatmeal cookies on the weekends and showed up at every one of her daughters’ special events.

Because of their circumstances the family of three didn’t have much discretionary money but Francis made sure the girls had the things they needed, as well as a little extra when she could provide it. Always a saver and adamant that you pay attention to every dime spent, she wanted to make sure her daughters learned to respect money. For this reason she was often heard to say, ‘pay your bills first, put some in savings second, and only then is the rest yours to spend as you wish.’

At the age of eleven Deanne came to truly understand the money management lesson her mother was trying to teach.

At that time, some twenty years ago, Deanne coveted a pair of popular, and expensive, designer jeans. She ran home one day after school and begged her mom for a pair, explaining nonchalantly they cost only $80. You can probably imagine Francis’ initial reaction when she found out how much her daughter wanted her to spend on one pair of jeans.

She told Deanne quite sternly that she would not be getting a pair and needed to get her head out of the clouds. Of course, this was not the answer Deanne wanted and she began to plead for the jeans. Finally too frustrated to listen any longer, Francis made a deal with her daughter. If she came home with good grades on her next report card she would receive half the money to buy a pair of the jeans. ‘You will have to come up with the other half,’ she further explained.

‘I don’t have a job,’ Deanne protested, thinking this deal was quite unfair.

‘You can earn it doing chores around here,’ Francis retorted.

During the next month Deanne weeded the yard, dusted everything in the house, cleaned bathrooms and washed dishes after every meal.

When her report card finally came, it arrived with excellent grades. That weekend Francis placed forty dollars in her daughter’s hand, representing the half she had promised to pay toward the jeans, and then placed the other half on top and said, ‘Good work, Deanne, I’m very proud of you. Now let’s go get these jeans!’”

Tune in tomorrow for the rest of the story.

Do you have a heartwarming mother-daughter story to tell? A glimpse into an important teaching moment between you and mom or daughter? A confirmation of love? Just a wonderful moment you’ll never forget? If yes, please let me know!

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Wednesday, July 16, 2008

Mom's Wisdom

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about family relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which children and parents might derive hope, guidance and a smile after reading them.

I am conducting recorded telephone interviews to gather the information necessary to portray your story. Interviews last 30-45 minutes; just send me an email (See “Links” below for my address) requesting an interview appointment.

For those who prefer to write their story rather than participate in an interview, you must submit it via my website. Please visit http://www.gregoryelang.com/ and click the red corner on the home page just beneath the “Projects” tab.

Stories are not published as submitted or told but rather are used as anecdotes told by me, the narrator, to help illustrate a message about teaching or cherished moments between mothers and daughters.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.
Stories about the fun moms and daughters have together, how moms teach daughters what it means to be a woman (putting on makeup, first period, first bra, first boyfriend), help with the challenges of a wedding and marriage, daughters helping mom in a technological world, etc., are all welcome.

NOTE: The deadline to offer a mother-daughter story has been reset to the original deadline of August 1st.

Now on to today’s post~

Sorry, no photo today due to technical problems at Blogger.

Here’s a story about the wisdom of moms and the quest for identity:

“As Brenda approached the end of her twelfth year she became increasingly worried about the changes that were approaching, those that accompanied becoming a teenager. Not the physical changes, those she was prepared for. She knew all about bras, periods and acne. But her friends, their parents, popular books and television programs of the day, conventional wisdom in general, all indicated that when a girl became a teenager, she had to rebel against her parents’ authority. She had to lose interest in childhood joys and delights; she had to suddenly become interested in makeup and fashion and boys.

Brenda didn’t want any part of that, she had other interests and certainly no such desire to rebel against her parents. Yet for days she worried that somehow everything would change, no matter what her wishes to the contrary, on the day she was to turn thirteen. She feared the different person she thought she was predetermined to become.

Overhearing muffled sobs coming through her daughter’s closed door, Dot slipped inside the bedroom to discover Brenda crying in her pillow. Taking a seat on the bed beside her and stroking her daughter’s hair, Dot coaxed out of the young girl an explanation of what had her so upset.

'I don’t want to be someone else,' Brenda explained between sniffles, 'I want to be me.'

Dabbing her cheeks with a tissue Dot smiled and explained to her oldest child it didn’t matter what anybody else expected or what people said ought to happen in a teenager’s life. 'You do not need to change to suit anybody,' she reassured. 'I love the individual you are.' Dot had never seen the point in doing something or acting a certain way just because other people expected it; she was determined to make sure Brenda adopted the same personal philosophy.

For years to follow her mother’s words and her daily example gave Brenda the courage to choose the course of her life. As she grew older and those around her tried to force her into a box, she became more and more determined to ignore conventional stereotypes and live her life on her own terms. As she had been since the age of thirteen, Brenda was who she wanted to be, not who others expected her to be.

Dot smiled approvingly when she learned her daughter’s first job would be in a hardware store and that her best friend was a guy with whom she shared no romantic interest.

At the age of twenty-five when Brenda gained firsthand experience in the joys and terrors of motherhood, she once again began to worry when her daughter did not behave the way she had been told babies were supposed to behave, or when she did something differently from the way she had been advised mothers ought to do things. Was it true her infant was supposed to eat and sleep in accordance with a schedule, and being out in the open public was bad for her health? Distressed she wasn’t mothering as well as she should, Brenda did the only thing she could think off – she picked up the phone and called her mom.”

Do you have a heartwarming mother-daughter story to tell? A glimpse into an important teaching moment between you and mom or daughter? A confirmation of love? Just a wonderful moment you’ll never forget? If yes, please let me know!

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Tuesday, July 15, 2008

Good Conversation

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about family relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which children and parents might derive hope, guidance and a smile after reading them.

I am conducting recorded telephone interviews to gather the information necessary to portray your story. Interviews last 30-45 minutes; just send me an email (See “Links” below for my address) requesting an interview appointment.

For those who prefer to write their story rather than participate in an interview, you must submit it via my website. Please visit www.gregoryelang.com and click the red corner on the home page just beneath the “Projects” tab.

Stories are not published as submitted or told but rather are used as anecdotes told by me, the narrator, to help illustrate a message about teaching or cherished moments between mothers and daughters.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

Stories about the fun moms and daughters have together, how moms teach daughters what it means to be a woman (putting on makeup, first period, first bra, first boyfriend), help with the challenges of a wedding and marriage, daughters helping mom in a technological world, etc., are all welcome.

NOTE: The deadline to offer a mother-daughter story has been reset to the original deadline of August 1st.

Now on to today’s post~

Today’s photo is of my sweet wife and mother-in-law sharing a moment looking through old photos of the apple of their eye, Linley.

A sample story for your enjoyment:

The kitchen table was where Nell forged and improved upon her relationship with her daughter, Yvonne. Everyday beginning in grade school and on through high school, when Yvonne came home the mother and daughter sat down at the table together and Nell asked questions about Yvonne’s day. It never mattered what Nell had been doing before Yvonne got home, she'd stop everything so that they could talk. She listened with interest to everything her daughter had to say, no matter how juvenile or silly it may have seemed at the time, believing that if the issue was important to her daughter, it should be important to her as well.

To Yvonne, time spent there in the kitchen at that round table made of teak wood, the one where her family gathered every evening to say the blessing and share a meal, was when she learned that even a child has thoughts and feelings of value. In the beginning they discussed which boys she liked, who didn’t reciprocate her admiration, and the things her friends might have said behind her back. As she grew older and more mature, they began to talk about college, marriage, faith and God. No matter what they talked about, having her mom’s time and ear instilled in Yvonne a sense of importance and an understanding of what being an attentive, loving mom really meant.

Today as Yvonne sits at that very same table, its place now in the kitchen of her own home, she remembers all those afternoons spent in earnest conversation with her mother. And when she looks up and sees her son sitting across the table in his highchair, she smiles, eager for their conversations to begin.

Do you have a heartwarming mother-daughter story to tell? A glimpse into an important teaching moment between you and mom or daughter? A confirmation of love? Just a wonderful moment you’ll never forget? If yes, please let me know!

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Monday, July 14, 2008

Mommy Magic

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about family relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which children and parents might derive hope, guidance and a smile after reading them.

I am conducting recorded telephone interviews to gather the information necessary to portray your story. Interviews last 30-45 minutes; just send me an email (See “Links” below for my address) requesting an interview appointment.

For those who prefer to write their story rather than participate in an interview, you must submit it via my website. Please visit http://www.gregoryelang.com/ and click the red corner on the home page just beneath the “Projects” tab.

Stories are not published as submitted or told but rather are used as anecdotes told by me, the narrator, to help illustrate a message about teaching or cherished moments between mothers and daughters.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

Stories about the fun moms and daughters have together, how moms teach daughters what it means to be a woman (putting on makeup, first period, first bra, first boyfriend), help with the challenges of a wedding and marriage, daughters helping mom in a technological world, etc., are all welcome.

NOTE: The deadline to offer a mother-daughter story has been reset to the original deadline of August 1st.

Now on to today’s post~

Here’s an excerpt from a story about the healing powers of Mom:

The night of the earache and that bout with the flu were years ago and now Vickie is a married mother. Yet, she still needs her mom, she confesses, craving her close comfort and magical healing powers whenever she becomes ill. Of course Vickie knows now her mom never possessed magic healing powers, but then there was indeed something very magical about her. Maybe it was the way she fluffed the pillows, touched her forehead with her hand first and then her lips, or the way she always moved the box of tissues and television remote a little closer by.

Or just maybe it was the love and attention of a concerned mother that made all the difference. Maybe that is where the magic is after all. And although Vickie has no particular medical knowledge, whenever her children are sick she is the nurse they call for, and they are always rewarded with a fluffed up pillow and a kiss on the forehead.

And this is a portion of a letter I received from a mom named Belinda:

She slept when she should, ate well and was always a healthy, happy baby. As she went through her childhood there was never a problem, she was an exceptional little girl. She experienced great friendships and loved life every day! As adolescence came and went, we had none of the usual Mother--Daughter issues. No problem with clothes, school or even boys. Sounds very strange, doesn’t it? But I am so blessed with this daughter that words don’t seem adequate.

She is now a lovely wife, mother, granddaughter, step-sister and sister-in-law. Her mothering skills are incredible and the thought that I had anything to do with her mind, body and spirit is beyond my comprehension. I remember times when I would lose my temper or not handle a particular situation tactfully. The times I have sat in horror thinking about “Why did I do that?” And yet God has allowed her to forget my short comings.

Sweet sentiments, indeed, don’t you think?

Do you have a heartwarming mother-daughter story to tell? A glimpse into an important teaching moment between you and mom or daughter? A confirmation of love? Just a wonderful moment you’ll never forget? If yes, please let me know!

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Friday, July 11, 2008

A Prayer Answered

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about family relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which children and parents might derive hope, guidance and a smile after reading them.

I am conducting recorded telephone interviews to gather the information necessary to portray your story. Interviews last 30-45 minutes; just send an email (Go to “Links” for my address) requesting an interview appointment.

For those who prefer to write their story rather than participate in an interview, you must submit it via my website. Please visit www.gregoryelang.com and click the red corner on the home page just beneath the “Projects” tab.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

NOTE: The deadline to offer a mother-daughter story has been reset to the original deadline of August 1st.

Now on to today’s post~

Today's photo is of Meagan and her mom and was taken a few years ago for my book "Why a Daughter Needs a Mom: 100 Reasons."

I have a sample for you today, the lead in to a story of a mother and daughter sharing their faith:

“Come back, Mommy,” Alexia shouted.

Margaret returned to her daughter’s room thinking her little girl wanted one more goodnight kiss. “What is it?” she asked, taking a seat on the edge of the bed.

“We forgot to pray.”

A smile emerged on Margaret’s face. “Then we should do it right now,” she said, swinging off the bed and dropping to her knees alongside her daughter’s pillow. Although Margaret had grown up almost never saying a prayer at bedtime, it was now a ritual she gladly shared every night with her daughter, her first child.

As she took Alexia’s hand and closed her eyes to listen to the little girl recite her bedtime prayer, mom’s thoughts drifted back to an earlier time in her life. When she was a little girl Margaret hated to attend church. Whether it was the scratchy Sunday dresses and too tight patent leather shoes, the boring big people sermons or, later, the personal philosophy that required she not believe in anything that couldn’t be empirically proven, Margaret resisted her mother’s attempts to keep her involved in the church. The willful daughter made it clear it was against her will when she did attend, and when she began living on her own she planned to never step across a church threshold on her own accord.

Although her mother, Pauline, was disappointed, she did not give up hope. She believed that one day her daughter would make room for God in her heart. She prayed and waited for that day to come.

I know, it’s cruel, but I’m saving the rest of this story for the book.

Do you have a heartwarming mother-daughter story to tell? If yes, please let me know!

Well it’s official – I have gone deaf in my right ear. It all began two months ago with what I thought was an earache but which turned out to be Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss. In other words, my dang ear stopped working. It’s really weird because although I can hear perfectly fine on the left side I cannot tell which direction sound is coming from. So now instead of looking right or left, I turn a complete circle when responding to a noise. Yep, I now look like an idiot walking down the street.

Have a good weekend all! Jill and I are baby sitting Roo while Mom and Dad living next door go to Chicago for the weekend. They say we are doing them a big favor. I say we are simply practicing being grandparents. And no, Meagan and Linley, those were not words of encouragement to hurry up and give us a grandchild.

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Wednesday, July 09, 2008

A Call of Thanks



I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about family relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which children and parents might derive hope, guidance and a smile after reading them.

I am conducting recorded telephone interviews to gather the information necessary to portray your story. Interviews last 30-45 minutes; just send an email (Go to “Links” for my address) requesting an interview appointment.

For those who prefer to write their story rather than participate in an interview, you must submit it via my website. Please visit www.gregoryelang.com and click the red corner on the home page just beneath the “Projects” tab.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

NOTE: The deadline to offer a mother-daughter story has been reset to the original deadline of August 1st.

Now on to today’s post~

Today’s sample is based on an email that with a number of back and forth questions, yielded this story:

Rochelle adored her son in more ways than she had ever imagined she could while waiting for him to enter the world. When the doctor laid him on her chest, the eyes of mother and son met for the first time and Rochelle felt, in a way, as if they were old friends. She had wanted a child for as long as she could remember.

Now, a year later, when she holds her child in her arms she is grateful for the few moments when the boy who always seems to be in perpetual motion is still. It is during these rare occasions when he is at rest in her arms, when she can examine his fingers and toes without protest, that she turns nostalgic and thinks of her own mother.

She wonders if her mother had wished for such tender moments in their relationship to last longer than they did, in not forever. She knows that she did. Sometimes she wonders if her mother was angry when awakened from a much needed sleep by cries of hunger or fears of monsters, but she knows that she was not. She thinks of all the times she threw up in her mother’s hands or spilled food on the linen tablecloth, and remembers that her mother was never annoyed or put off. She smiles thinking of all the time her mother spent working with her on science projects and altering a prom dress and remembers she never lost her patience.

Even though the little boy is just a little more than twelve months old, everyday brings to Rochelle the realization of all her mother must have done for her. Potty training, teaching her how to brush her teeth, to always mind her manners, to tie her shoes tight, to shave her legs and apply makeup – her mother taught them all.

Sometimes Rochelle wonders if she could ever recall everything her mother did for her, and every time when she justifiably might have been angry, impatient or disappointed, but wasn’t. She knew that she could not recall every time. Now and then Rochelle asks herself, usually after each new challenging experience with her son, if she has thanked her mother enough for all the things that she did. She chuckles, knowing it is impossible to say thanks often enough when she couldn’t even remember all the things she should be grateful for, all the things her mother had done for her.

That is why on these occasions when the beautiful boy falls asleep in her arms, when gratitude for her own happy childhood nearly overwhelms her, that she carefully puts her son in bed for the remainder of his nap, and then reaches for the phone – to call her mother.

Have a story to tell? Please let me know!

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Tuesday, July 08, 2008

Absolutely Beautiful

I am searching for heartfelt and inspirational stories about family relationships, stories that share wisdom and teach important moral and life lessons, stories from which children and parents might derive hope, guidance and a smile after reading them.

I am conducting recorded telephone interviews to gather the information necessary to portray your story. Interviews last 30-45 minutes; just send an email (Go to “Links” for my address) requesting an interview appointment.

For those who prefer to write their story rather than participate in an interview, you must submit it via my website. Please visit www.gregoryelang.com and click the red corner on the home page just beneath the “Projects” tab.

If this is your first visit to my blog, please read the Frequently Asked Questions posted on March 20, 2008.

NOTE: The deadline to offer a mother-daughter story has been reset to the original deadline of August 1st.

Now on to today’s post~

Today’s photo was sent to me by Tasha Via; she is posing with her little angel. Tasha’s website is www.tashavia.blogspot.com.

My editor has returned the first draft of Mom’s Little Angel. I have more work to do: a few more stories are needed and a few major life events have not been covered yet. Check in tomorrow for a list of subjects I hope will be addressed by new stories that have yet to come in.

To all the story-tellers who are considering participating in this project, please be aware of the following – I am now focusing on moments of great meaning, events that were pivotal and memorable in some way. I have all the sweet reflections I need that honor the mother for all she did. At this time I need stories of specific events that the reader can see themselves in, be it their past or anticipated future.

Jill and I have just returned from an extended-family gathering at the beach. There were 18 of us gathered in three condos overlooking the ocean. We ate, we drank, we laughed and we slept late. That’s what I call a family vacation! And yes, it is where I learned “argh” is an acceptable word in Scrabble.

I suppose I owe an update on the New Year’s resolution that counted the most – weight. The bad news is I did not reach my goal of 210 by June 15th. The good news is I now have only 5 more pounds to go. I’m down a total of 27 pounds since the beginning of the year.

And now on to a sample story:

A Loving, Giving Example

Whitney stood before the mirror getting ready for the biggest day of her life thus far, her wedding day. Her hair was done just as she had instructed, her dress was perfect, the flowers were gorgeous, yet something didn’t seem quite right. Her mind began to race; what had she forgotten, what could go wrong?

There was a light touch on her arm. “You look absolutely beautiful,” a soothing voice said. “He’s going to be so impressed, so very proud of you.” Whitney turned and looked into her mother’s beautiful reassuring green eyes. Her jitters faded away; everything was going to be all right now.

Her mother’s voice had always comforted and reassured, prompting Whitney to believe in the goodness of everyone, the best intention behind every action and the simple blessing of each new day. It was always her mother who could make anything seem better, who managed to find the bright side of things when everyone else saw only shadows. It was Claire, her mother, who Whitney had always wanted most to be like when she grew up.

Whether it was fresh bread in the oven or a pot roast whistling in a pressure cooker on the stove, the delicious smells of home cooking greeted Whitney each day when she burst through the front door returning home from school. And just as she did every afternoon when her daughter retuned home from school, Claire put aside what she was doing to sit at the kitchen table. There she and Whitney talked about the events of the young girl’s day. No detail was too small or meaningless; everything that bothered or interested Whitney was of upmost importance to Claire. And no matter what dilemma agonized Whitney, her mom managed to help her see things differently, to see things in a way that left the young girl feeling of confident, capable and worthy.

There were times when Claire had to work out of the home but she never once denied a phone call from Whitney, or any of her other children for that matter, or said that she was too busy to hear of what was on their minds. She was always there, a refuge from the big and scary world, a supporter and cheerleader for each of her children. Wanting more than anything else to be a good mom, Claire worked nights, reporting for duty after her husband had come home and her children had fallen asleep. Tired as she was, breakfast was always ready when her children arose in the morning, and she waited until they slipped out the door to catch the school bus before she let her eyelids close for some much needed rest.

The bride turned her gaze back to the mirror, not to look at herself again, but to admire the woman standing next to her, the woman who had taught her by example how to be the mother she knew she too would one day become.

If in doubt of what to tell me, just send an email and we’ll discuss it through until we reach a conclusion about which golden moments in your life need to be told.

Well, I guess that’s enough for today. Thanks so much for visiting my blog. Now go out and hug somebody!

Saturday, July 05, 2008